Remote desktop

Andrew Jarrett jarrett.andrew at gmail.com
Fri Feb 8 04:17:26 GMT 2008


On Feb 7, 2008 11:01 PM, David McGlone <d.mcglone at att.net> wrote:
> On Thursday 07 February 2008 5:39:10 pm David Fletcher wrote:
> > Seems to work for me. I set the router to forward port 22 to my home server
> > and set iptables to accept port 22 from the fixed IP address of the server
> > at work. Used ssh to log in to the server at work from my desktop then back
> > again to my current IP address at home, which worked.
> >
> > So, yes, it seems to be OK to set up port forwarding on a router with a
> > dynamic IP address, so long as you know what the ISP has set the address to
> > at any time.
>
> Are you saying, that, say for instance her ISP renews her IP, will something
> break? or are you saying that in order to log in remotely I will need the IP
> whenever it changes?
>
> --
> David M.

Most ISPs do not assign their customers static IP addresses, they
simply lease an IP address for a temporary time period before it
changes again (mine changes about every two weeks or so).  You will
need to know what her WAN IP is at the time, but this shouldn't be
hard to find (my belkin router shows "WAN IP" on the main page).  This
shouldn't really affect you that much and it shouldn't affect port
forwarding.  If you want a solution to this you can look into setting
up a free account with someone like dyndns.org.  You will be able to
choose a domain name (like [your choice].dyndns.org) and your
mother-in-law will have to download a client to keep her domain
updated to her WAN IP.  Then you could just remember her domain name
instead of bugging her for her IP whenever it changes.  I think that
is a little overkill for the situation at hand, though.

Andrew

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