<div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">
>>> I'm happy enough to do that, but I'd rather have an answer to my<br>
>>> original, more general question:<br>
>>><br>
>>> Is it possible to have Ubuntu mount all visible filesystems<br>
>>> automatically on boot?<br>
>><br>
><br>
> Yes, it is possible.<br>
><br>
>><br>
>> Possible, yes.  But I can't tell you how off the top of my head and a quick<br>
>> google search did not find an appropriate script.<br>
><br>
> No, I know that; I searched before asking.<br>
><br>
>> And probably not what you want anyhow.<br>
><br>
> Er, yes, it is, or else I would not have asked for it.<br>
><br>
>> Assuming your typical use case for this disk is to access the contents via a<br>
>> desktop GUI, you need only modify Ubuntu so that the console user (that,<br>
>> someone who is logged in from the physical computer screen/keyboard/mouse<br>
>> rather than network) has permission to mount internal drives.<br>
><br>
> No, not really!<br>
><br>
> I can mount drives from the GUI, but that is no help with (for<br>
> example) Dropbox, which will not start because my shared Dropbox<br>
> volume is not accessible at login.<br>
><br>
> Your problem is of permissions. Auto-mount the vfat system normally using fstab (whichever options you require or defaults). Then, change the permissions on the folder as such:<br>
<br>
</div>It is not a permissions issue. I can mount the drive just fine from<br>
the command line or the GUI.<br></blockquote><div><br>I had a similar issue on a Debian system that had a vfat (fat32) 
filesystem from a previous XP install. I could mount filesystem, but 
could not read/write to it. I asked on the #debian IRC channel and they 
told me this:<br>
<br>The permissions in fstab (like users etc.) allow non-sudo users to 
mount/umount the drive. But reading/writing to the drive is not managed 
by fstab. In short, the permissions for reading/writing cannot be 
confgured from fstab.<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I do not want *just* this drive mounted. I want *all* drives mounted,<br>
at boot, before X loads and before I login.<br></blockquote><div><br>I had a similar issue on a Debian system that had a vfat (fat32) 
filesystem from a previous XP install. I could mount filesystem, but 
could not read/write to it. I asked on the #debian IRC channel and they 
told me this:<br>
<br>The permissions in fstab (like users etc.) allow non-sudo users to 
mount/umount the drive. But reading/writing to the drive is not managed 
by fstab. In short, the permissions for reading/writing cannot be 
confgured from fstab.<br>
 <div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I do not want *just* this drive mounted. I want *all* drives mounted,<br>
at boot, before X loads and before I login.<br></blockquote></div><br>Just
 put one entry for each drive that you want to mount into fstab. Put 
'pass' as '2' for all the drives (except swap and the '/' filesystem). 
All drives listed in fstab are auto-mounted at boot time.<br>
<br>Best Regards,<br>Rigved Rakshit <br></div></div>