<div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div><br><span><div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"><span>Review what is installed "dpkg --list" and 
remove what you KNOW you don't need. Another place to start is /etc/init.d to 
see directory what services are installed.</span></font></div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"><span></span></font> </div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"><span>In practice I believe you will only gain 
very minimal improvements by disabling services. I would do this only from a 
security point of view or when the server is actually maximally loaded (when you 
should rather consider upgrading).</span></font> <span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"> </font></span></div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">VMWare takes quite a performance impact 
from virtualizing hardware. So ensure you:</font></span></div>
<ul dir="ltr">
  <li>
  <div align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">Use VMWare drivers, as they can 'avoid' using hardware emulation and 
  take a more efficient route.</font></span></div></li>
  <li>
  <div align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">Reduce requirements for hardware resources. Make sure you have 
  sufficient memory for caching.</font></span></div></li></ul>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">Also monitor system load and performance. Ensure 
you don't spends hours on winning virtually nothing.</font></span></div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"></font></span> </div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">If your virtualizing only Linux, you could 
attempt the Xen route, which makes use of paravirtualizaiton, avoiding the 
hardware emulation steps. In all cases, you will pay for virtualization. Only 
the price varies.</font></span></div>
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2"></font></span> </div><font color="#888888">
<div class="gmail_quote" dir="ltr" align="left"><span><font color="#0000ff" face="Arial" size="2">- Joris</font></span></div></font></span></div>
</blockquote><div><br><br>I ran 'dpkg --list' and it resulted in over 200 packages.  I wanted a general rule of thumb when building a VMware server.  Trying to get close to ESX as possible.<br><br>Also, I did virtualize one Windows 2003 box.  How can I update it with full vmware drivers?  Uninstall them from device manager and 'scan for new hardware'?<br>
<br>-Devon<br></div></div><br>