<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
<br>
John R Cichy wrote:
<blockquote cite="mid:1169340247.15221.112.camel@development"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">On Sun, 2007-01-21 at 00:08 +0000, Bob Adams wrote:

  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">Adding machines to a network without DHCP is _always a pain :) Is there
a special reason why you use static addresses?

      </pre>
    </blockquote>
    <pre wrap="">Because I do not have a DHCP server and also because I want to use the
same addresses as my Windows PC's.

    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->I hope you mean the same subnet, or that the windows machines are
powered down when the Ubuntu machines are running (though still can't be
sure why you would do this except in a dual-boot situation). Two
computers can NOT share IP's on the network. That would be like you
sharing the same phone number with your neighbor.

John 
  </pre>
</blockquote>
However if you have dual-boot machines and you want each OS to have the
same address then that's easier to do in DHCP than in each OS
separately. You put the MAC address of the machine in the DHCP config
file. So when it hands out leases it ALWAYS hands the same IP to the
same machine irrespective of what OS it booted under. If you use bind
or distribute your 'hosts' file around you can then use the same name
for each PC and will all just 'work'.<br>
<br>
Running a DHCP server has virtually no overhead other than learning the
config file. So if you have a machine that is  always on and it runs
Ubuntu then you can put DHCP on this fairly easily.<br>
<pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Kind Regards Russell
==================
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.windsorcycles.com.au">www.windsorcycles.com.au</a>
bikes.no-ip.info
Linux user #369094
================== 
</pre>
</body>
</html>