<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 10/06/05, <b class="gmail_sendername">Paul Sladen</b> <<a href="mailto:ubuntu@paul.sladen.org">ubuntu@paul.sladen.org</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On Fri, 10 Jun 2005, Michael Richter wrote:<br>> > Does anyone else have suggestions on how to make it work?<br>> [..] so I can just plug in my USB key and have my system set up the way<br>> it needs to be (particularly useful in a static IP environment) and my
<br>> home directory comfortably mounted?<br><br>Anything's possible the problem is that there are too many possibilities.<br>For your part, can you help define what should happen:<br><br>  (a) What devices should be hunted for
</blockquote><div><br>
Any mountable device suited to having persistent configuration and/or
home directories.  This includes, but is not limited to, floppy
disks (bleah!), USB disks (both flash and just portable disk drives),
PCMCIA devices, etc.  Basically any block storage device is a
candidate for this.<br>
</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">  (b) Should they be plane devices;  FAT devices with a loopback</blockquote><div>
<br>
Since I have no idea what this means, I cannot answer this question. <br>
</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">  (c) How to ensure that livecd and USB key version match before proceeding</blockquote>
<div><br>
A version check vs. a stored version number, perhaps? <br>
</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">If you can come up with a good flow-chart/task-list of points and order they<br>should be done in (and put it up on the wiki) then I expect somebody else
<br>can help you take that and work from it.</blockquote><div><br>
Or you can just look at distributions like Knoppix or XSoL (if memory
serves) and see how they did it.  Only don't make the user type
"config=scan home=scan" at boot time -- just assume that the user wants
this.<br>
</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">Don't worry, you don't have to know how it works at the lowest level, but it<br>needs some more fleshing-out beyond ''plug a device in and it works''.  Try
<br>to describe the steps involved.</blockquote><div><br>
Take a Knoppix distro.  Go through the steps to make a persistent
home and a persistent configuration.  (Or use XSoL for a different
take on it.)  Boot.  For both, type the various magic
incantations they demand for these situations.  (For Knoppix it
was "config=scan" and "home=scan".  For XSoL I can't remember what
it was.)  Watch the results.<br>
<br>
Then do the same in Ubuntu.  Just assume, since Ubuntu is supposed
to be for human beings, not geeks (and my tongue is firmly planted in
cheek here, so please don't go off on a rant;-)), don't make people
type anything in.  Just scan for home and for configuration
automatically and if it's present load it.  If not, ignore
it.  (I would guess that if there were multiple possibilities
you'd need to ask the user which.)<br>
<br>
Then for the next trick, make Ubuntu work out of the box with simple printer configurations.  :-)<br>
<br>
</div></div>