Silly question relating to graphics cards?

Liam Proven lproven at gmail.com
Wed Sep 5 13:13:19 UTC 2012


On 5 September 2012 13:58, Felix Miata <mrmazda at earthlink.net> wrote:
> On 2012/09/05 12:39 (GMT+0100) Liam Proven composed:
>
>
>> David Fletcher wrote:
>
>
>>> why isn't there an Intel based PCI-E graphics card
>>> for putting into desktop computers?
>
>
>> They do exist but they are rare.
>
>
>> The reasons are 2 fold&  quite simple:
>>
>>
>> [a] In recent years, Intel GPUs are built into the CPU itself and
>> before that into the motherboard chipset; they are not discrete
>> components.
>
>
>> [b] Intel GPUs are so poor in performance nobody would buy one as an
>> upgrade. :¬)
>
>
>> But they used to exist.
>
>
>> There are or were also graphics cards from many other vendors -
>> Matrox, 3DFX, S3, SIS, Hercules, Via and dozens of others. However all
>> were poor compared to the high-end 3D GPUs that came out of ATI and
>> nVidia. In the end,  by the PCI-E era, everyone else gave up.
>
>
> Doesn't look like it to me:
> http://tinyurl.com/bq8yymk
> http://tinyurl.com/cvhexey
> http://tinyurl.com/ckfsg2s
> etc.

So when I said:
>
>> They do exist but they are rare.

... What part of that was unclear?

Secondly, you /really/ don't want to pay $200+ for one of those. They
are aimed exclusively at specialist applications, such as video walls,
many-way multihead machines and so on these days.

> Since I never do anything that is "3D", I've yet to observe any advantage to
> chips offering "3D". To be sure, I have been disappointed to find Intel
> video unable with single core P4 CPUs up to 3.4GHGZ to play HD video with
> e.g. VLC and SMPlayer that the FOSS drivers and ATI & NVidia chips can.

The 3D accelerators don't *just* do 3D. They also do hardware video
decode and so on.

This is what Moore's Law /really/ means: not speed, but more
transistors per unit price. The companys have to "spend" the
transistor budget on something; graphics chip makers use the
transistors for hardware-assisted anything-they-can-think-of to try to
justify the prices.

This is why many notebooks now offer both a low-power & high-power
GPU. For most purposes, in ordinary use, you don't need a big GPU -
few people/apps actually require what it does.

Secondly, the P4 was a really poor chip with rotten performance. HD is
quite demanding - that's a lot of bandwidth.


-- 
Liam Proven • Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
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