changing grub

Joep L. Blom jlblom at neuroweave.nl
Sat Apr 4 22:49:01 UTC 2009


Ray Parrish wrote:
> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
>> --- On Sat, 4/4/09, Ray Parrish <crp at cmc.net> wrote:
>>
>>   
>>> From: Ray Parrish <crp at cmc.net>
>>> Subject: Re: changing grub
>>> To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions" <ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com>
>>> Date: Saturday, April 4, 2009, 1:36 PM
>>> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
>>>     
>>>> --- On Sat, 4/4/09, Ray Parrish <crp at cmc.net>
>>>>       
>>> wrote:
>>>     
>>>>   
>>>>       
>>>>> From: Ray Parrish <crp at cmc.net>
>>>>> Subject: Re: changing grub
>>>>> To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for
>>>>>         
>>> general discussions"
>>> <ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com>
>>>     
>>>>> Date: Saturday, April 4, 2009, 7:30 AM
>>>>> Derek Broughton wrote:
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> Knute Johnson wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>   
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>>>> Vincent Trouilliez wrote:
>>>>>>>     
>>>>>>>         
>>>>>>>             
>>>>>>>> On Sat, 28 Mar 2009 10:50:10 -0600
>>>>>>>> Gary Kirkpatrick
>>>>>>>>               
>>> <pegngary at gmail.com>
>>>     
>>>>>>>>           
>>>>>>>>               
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>>>>       
>>>>>>>>           
>>>>>>>>               
>>>>>>>>> My wife wants windows to be the
>>>>>>>>>                 
>>> first
>>>     
>>>>>>>>>             
>>>>>>>>>                 
>>>>> loading choice when grub comes up
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>>>>> (shame on her!).  Is there a way
>>>>>>>>>                 
>>> to do
>>>     
>>>>>>>>>             
>>>>>>>>>                 
>>>>> that?
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>>>>>         
>>>>>>>>>             
>>>>>>>>>                 
>>>>>>>> Yep, just edit this file:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> /boot/grub/menu.lst
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>       
>>>>>>>>           
>>>>>>>>               
>>>>>>> The option is the;
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> default             0
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> change it to the number of your windows
>>>>>>>             
>>> entry.  If
>>>     
>>>>>>>         
>>>>>>>             
>>>>> you update and add a
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>>> kernel, you will have to do this again.
>>>>>>>     
>>>>>>>         
>>>>>>>             
>>>>>> Actually, not.  As menu.lst says:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> # Put static boot stanzas before and/or after
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> AUTOMAGIC KERNEL LIST
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> ### BEGIN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
>>>>>> ## lines between the AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
>>>>>>           
>>> markers
>>>     
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> will be modified
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> ## by the debian update-grub script except for
>>>>>>           
>>> the
>>>     
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> default options below
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> So, what you do if you _must_ have Windows
>>>>>>           
>>> first (and
>>>     
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> can't get a
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> divorce...) is move the Windows stanza
>>>>>>           
>>> _before_ the
>>>     
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> AUTOMAGIC KERNELS, and
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>>>> then it will always be the first option.
>>>>>>   
>>>>>>       
>>>>>>           
>>>>> Hello,
>>>>>
>>>>> Just wanted to address a small fine point here.
>>>>>         
>>> When
>>>     
>>>>> starting a GUI 
>>>>> application with root privileges, such as gedit
>>>>>         
>>> you need to
>>>     
>>>>> use the gksu 
>>>>> command on the start of the line, not the sudo
>>>>>         
>>> command,
>>>     
>>>>> which is used 
>>>>> for command line programs. so the earlier given
>>>>>         
>>> command to
>>>     
>>>>> edit menu.lst 
>>>>> should be -
>>>>>
>>>>> gksu gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst &
>>>>>
>>>>> I have also added an "&" on the end
>>>>>         
>>> of the
>>>     
>>>>> command line, which will 
>>>>> cause gedit to fork away from the Terminal
>>>>>         
>>> session, so that
>>>     
>>>>> shutting 
>>>>> down the Terminal window will not also shut down
>>>>>         
>>> your gedit
>>>     
>>>>> session, 
>>>>> which is will do, without the & on the end of
>>>>>         
>>> the line.
>>>     
>>>>> If however, you 
>>>>> want any error messages generated by gedit to be
>>>>>         
>>> printed to
>>>     
>>>>> the terminal 
>>>>> window, leave off the &, and leave the
>>>>>         
>>> Terminal window
>>>     
>>>>> open until you 
>>>>> are done with gedit.
>>>>>
>>>>> The reason for my clarification of this point is
>>>>>         
>>> that in my
>>>     
>>>>> experience, 
>>>>> attempting to start a GUI program with sudo
>>>>>         
>>> usually will
>>>     
>>>>> not start the 
>>>>> program. You issue the command, get prompted for
>>>>>         
>>> your
>>>     
>>>>> password in 
>>>>> terminal, then nothing happens after that.
>>>>>
>>>>> Later, Ray Parrish
>>>>>
>>>>>     
>>>>>         
>>>> Very strange, to me anyway, that you said and
>>>>       
>>> experienced what you did above.  Although, I've read on
>>> the list about using gksu ipo sudo for gui applications,
>>> I've never had an issue using sudo nano to edit any type
>>> of file using Kubuntu desktop anyway. I rarely use gnome as
>>> I like the kubuntu eye candy better but of course in an
>>> Ubuntu install. I don't understand the need for the
>>> &, why would anyone stop a terminal session while
>>> editing from it? Even if stopped by error, it's simle to
>>> restart it and continue. Gnome, or the Ubuntu Desktop, may
>>> react differently than the Kubuntu Desktop, I really
>>> don't know. Nano is the default editor for Kubuntu and
>>> works well for me in an Ubuntu install. I am using Kensole
>>> or a tty terminal in reference to what I've said.  Just
>>> another persons viewpoint.
>>>     
>>>> Leonard Chatagnier
>>>> lenc5570 at sbcglobal.net
>>>>   
>>>>       
>>> Hello,
>>>
>>> You're mixing apples and oranges there. nano is a
>>> command line editor 
>>> which only works within terminal, not a true GUI editor
>>> like gedit, so 
>>> of course it starts just fine with sudo.
>>>     
>> I'm mixing apples and oranges? Did you not use the word terminal several times in your reply I commented on? Konsole, if I'm not mistaken is a gui application running under X windows, Kubuntu or Ubuntu. If your talking about editing with any editor from a menu in gnome or kde, then you may be right as I don't usually do that. But your reference to terminal led me to believe you were refering to a gnome terminal or konsole operating in an X-window.
>>
>>   
>>> Maybe in Kubuntu
>>> they have 
>>> expanded nano into an application that can run in it's
>>> own GUI window, 
>>> but on Ubuntu, it's just an application which runs only
>>> within a 
>>> Terminal window.
>>>
>>>     
>> or terminal emulator which konsole is.
>>
>>   
>>> As to using the "&" with gedit, I sometimes
>>> want to use gedit for quite 
>>> a while on more than one file in root mode, but have no
>>> need to keep the 
>>> Terminal window open past the initial use of it to get
>>> gedit started in 
>>> root mode. I'm not editing from the terminal window,
>>> I'm using a GUI 
>>> application to do the editing. So, if I don't use the
>>> "&" and then close 
>>> Terminal, it will close gedit before I'm ready for it
>>> to.
>>>
>>>     
>> That's why I use konsole. What your doing is too complicated and I acknowledge you have put much more than I into learning how Ubuntu works.
>>  
>>   
>>> I much prefer the full use of the mouse and other GUI
>>> niceties when I'm 
>>> editing files, so I always use gedit, instead of any of the
>>> command line 
>>> editors like pine, nano, etc... with all of their unusual
>>> key combos 
>>> needed to control them. 8-)
>>>
>>>     
>> Really, as mentioned above, the way you do it is much more difficult for me.  I prefer the menus for most things but for updating, upgrading programs and editing configuration files, IMO, the command line in Konsole is much faster and efficient. YMDV in this regard.
>> Again, this is only my opinion but before you tell someone they are mixing apples and oranges, maybe you need to be sure you are saying exactly what you mean. Sometimes using a word like "terminal" can mean several different things whereas konsole or tty is more specific.
>> Leonard Chatagnier
>> lenc5570 at sbcglobal.net
>>   
> I'm sorry for any confusion you may be experiencing reference this 
> thread, but the OP was being advised to start "gedit" with sudo, which 
> doesn't work, it's a GUI application.
> 
> The Terminal I keep referring to, is the default command line interface 
> for Ubuntu, and is actually the binary gnome-terminal. It resides on the 
> Applications, Accessories menu named only "Terminal". It can actually be 
> considered a GUI application itself, as it is, but anything meant to run 
> from within it's confines, is not a GUI application, but rather a 
> command line application.
> 
> As you can see, I actually thought I was being quite specific when using 
> the word "Terminal", as it is the default command line interface 
> provided to Ubuntu users, and as such, I was under the impression 
> everyone else knew what it was.
> 
> The command line editors usage of key combos which are unfamiliar to me, 
> is precisely why I find them more difficult to use, compared to the 
> familiarity of the GUI based gedit, which is known only as "Text Editor" 
> on the Ubuntu menus. Being a long time Windows user before coming to 
> Ubuntu, I find it more efficient to use what I'm more familiar with, 
> rather than attempting to learn the whole new set of key combos utilized 
> in the Linux command line editors.
> 
> Later, Ray Parrish
> 
Leonard,
Sorry to disagree. I'm working with hardy and when I want to edit 
non-user-related files (e.g. those in /etc or it's subdirectories), the 
only correct way is either use "sudo gedit" or use gedit from a 
root-terminal. You cannot edit files with owner root in another way. due 
to the Unix privilege system, which is a necessity as unix is a 
multiprogram multi-user OS, contrary to Windows (any flavour) that is a 
multiprogram, single-user system (although the later flavours mimic 
multi-user).
Joep




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