Gutsy Upgrade problem

Rick Knight rick_knight at rlknight.com
Thu Mar 20 04:15:01 UTC 2008


NoOp wrote:
> On 03/19/2008 08:05 AM, Rick Knight wrote:
>   
>>>> NoOp,
>>>>
>>>> I ran the command as you suggested, update-initramfs -k 
>>>> 2.6.22-a4-generic -u, and checked the time and date of 
>>>> /boot/initrd.img-2.6.22-14-generic and it looks like the command took. I 
>>>> rebooted and still go the BusyBox prompt and my hard drive are not 
>>>> present. My USB mass storage device is OK and my ZipDrive is visible, 
>>>> just no hard drives ( have 2, linux is on /dev/hdb). Anything else you 
>>>> can suggest?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> Rick
>>>>
>>>>     
>>>>         
>>> I presume you mean:
>>>
>>> sudo update-initramfs -c -k 2.6.22-14-generic
>>>
>>>   
>>>       
>>>> I've used blkid to verify the uuid is correct. I've edited
>>>> /boot/grub/menu.lst and /etc/fstab to use drive path (/dev/hdb5 &
>>>> /dev/sdb5) instead of uuid.
>>>>     
>>>>         
>>> You might want to relook at your fstab - they should be sdb vs hdb. Here
>>> is a copy of mine:
>>>
>>> # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
>>> #
>>> # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
>>> proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
>>> # /dev/sda1
>>> UUID=<myuuid> /     ext3    defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>>> # /dev/sda5
>>> <myuuid> none   swap    sw              0       0
>>> /dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
>>> /dev/scd1       /media/cdrom1   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
>>> /dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto  0       0
>>> # /dev/sdb1
>>> /dev/sdb1    /media/windows ntfs  iocharset=utf8,umask=000  0    0
>>>
>>> Note: sdb1 is a dual boot drive for windows. No UUID works, but
>>> eventually I'll get around to putting a UUID there.
>>>
>>> If all else fails, you can try substituting the UUID temporarily and use
>>> /dev/sda1 & /dev/sda5 to see if you can boot.
>>>
>>> My grub menu.lst on this machine looks like this:
>>>
>>> title		Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.22-14-generic
>>> root		(hd0,0)
>>> kernel		/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.22-14-generic root=<myuuid> ro quiet splash
>>> initrd		/boot/initrd.img-2.6.22-14-generic
>>>
>>> I'd also try using the alternate CD and select "rescue a broken system"
>>> + options.
>>>
>>> Other than that, you'll need Nils...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>   
>>>       
>> NoOp,
>>
>> Yesterday I ran the command as "sudo update-initramfs -k 
>> 2.6.22-14-generic -u" and then rebooted. No change, still boots to Busy 
>> Box prompt. Then I ran the command again like this "sudo 
>> update-initramfs -c -k 2.6.22-14-generic" and again rebooted. Same 
>> thing, Busy Box shell and a message indicating my drives can't be found.
>>
>> I've studied my /etc/fstab and it looks correct. I've substituted the 
>> drives UUID with the path, both /dev/hdb5 and /dev/sdb5, modifying 
>> /boot/grub/menu.lst to match. Neither works and in fact when I use 
>> /dev/sdb5 grub can't find the boot loader at all, maybe this is part of 
>> the problem. I have never been able to use /dev/sdb drive spec, only 
>> /dev/hdb even on Feisty. My notebook and my desktop at work were both 
>> using /dev/sdx but my desktop at home would only use /dev/hdx.
>>
>> Don't know if they'll help, but I'm attaching my fstab and menu.lst
>>
>> Any other suggestion?
>>
>> Thanks, Rick
>>
>>     
>
> What happens when you select:
> Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.22-14-generic (recovery mode)
>   
I get the same results, whether I use the recovery mod or normal mode. 
The only difference is the message states that /dev/hdb5.
> To ensure that the UUID's are correct in the grub file, issue:
>
> $ sudo update-grub
>
> That will place the correct UUID's in your grub file. There is no
> similar command (that I know of) for doing the same for your fstab, so:
>
> $ sudo fdisk -l
>
> Now check the UUIDs again for the drives & swap:
>
> $ sudo /sbin/vol_id -u /dev/sd*
>   
rick at rick:/home/rick$ sudo /sbin/vol_id -u /dev/hdb5
cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13

This looks correct to me.

> where * is a1, a5, b1, etc. Issue it for each partition Linux and Swap
> listed in fdisk -l. That will give you the correct UUIDs for those
> devices. Leave the terminal window open and open a second terminal
> window and open gedit (I assume you are using Gnome not KDE):
>
> $ gksu gedit /etc/fstab
>
> Now copy & paste the UUID's from the first terminal window into the
> gedit fstab file for the appropriate device (modifying as below first).
> That way you avoid missing a character and using uppercase wheh it
> should be lower case etc.
>
> Reboot & try the gutsy kernel.
>
> Regarding your fstab - it isn't right:
>   
For some reason I am unable to use the /dev/sd* drive designation. Even 
in Feisty I could not use /dev/sd*. I've only been able to use /dev/hd* 
and the UUID. Maybe this is part of the problem. When I change 
grub/menu.lst and fstab to use /dev/sd* my ststem will not even read 
vmlinuz from /boot.
>   
>> # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
>> #
>> # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
>> proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
>> /dev/hdb5	/	ext3	defaults 0 2
>> #UUID=cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13 /               ext3    defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>> # /dev/hdb1
>> UUID=e3756958-033e-41a9-b193-b04e66efb452 /boot2          ext3    defaults        0       2
>> # /dev/hda1
>> UUID=448C-C79B  /media/hda1     vfat    defaults,utf8,umask=007,gid=46 0       1
>> # /dev/hda2
>> UUID=d6f73dcb-5ca0-4c1d-85e1-48e7146026b3 /media/hda2     ext3    defaults        0       2
>> # /dev/hda5
>> UUID=a13285d9-22aa-45f0-86c1-7612dd07c8a7 /media/hda5     ext3    defaults        0       2
>> # /dev/hda6
>> UUID=8c1fbc9c-8304-4f24-b5bb-af1626035357 none            swap    sw              0       0
>> # /dev/hdb6
>> UUID=7c1edba8-4077-4dae-9454-9336e87d614c none            swap    sw              0       0
>> /dev/hdc        /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
>> /dev/hdd        /media/cdrom1   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
>> /dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto  0       0
>>     
>
> This is a problem - you are trying to mount from an hdb when gutsy uses
> sdb and UUID:
>   
I have never been able to get /dev/sd* to work. Only /dev/hd* and uuid. 
I'm using this PC now by booting from the third boot stanza in 
grub/menu.lst (Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.20-16-generic) and it works OK.
>   
>> /dev/hdb5	/	ext3	defaults 0 2
>> #UUID=cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13 /               ext3
>>     
> defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>
> If you are trying to boot from hdb5, this should read:
>
> # /dev/sdb5
> UUID=cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13 /               ext3
> defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>   
I have tried this. It doesn't work for me. with the UUID and with 
/dev/hd* I get the Busy Box prompt. With /dev/sd* it won't even begin to 
boot.
> It will boot and mount correctly using only sdb5 in fstab:
>
> /dev/sdb5 /               ext3    defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>
> but you really do need to change it to the UUID after testing.
>
> [assuming that cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13 is the correct uuid).
>   
Everything says this is the correct UUID and it works with the 
2.6.20-16-generic kernel
> You might try just a simple fstab first (save your old under a different
> name & ensure the UUID's are correct) to clear out the possibility of
> problems with the other device definitions:
>
> # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
> #
> # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
> proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
> # /dev/sdb5 (change sd* and UUID if necessary)
> UUID=cb18ce85-3710-4259-9abb-ce8a0ca67e13 /               ext3
> defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
> # /dev/sdb6 (change sd* and UUID if necessary)
> UUID=8c1fbc9c-8304-4f24-b5bb-af1626035357 none            swap    sw
>           0       0
> /dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
> /dev/scd1       /media/cdrom1   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0
> /dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto  0       0
>
> And boot. If you get the basics correct (main partition & swap) then you
> can add in your other drives/partions one by one.
>
> If the above screws up your feisty drive mounts, don't panic, just boot
> into recovery mode and change the fstab back to the old.
>
>
>   
Why did Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Debian go to /dev/sd* drive designation? What 
kernel modules are involved? Since /dev/sd  is essentially SCSI Disk I 
assume it's part of SCSI subsystem, but what makes it see IDE/EIDE/ATA 
Hard drives? Maybe I'm missing some part of that.

Thanks again,
Rick




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