New User in need of quick lesson

Owen Townend owen.townend at gmail.com
Fri Mar 7 03:12:13 UTC 2008


On 3/7/08, Jesse Robertson <briscoelake at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Thank you both for your responses.  I printed your list Kim which will
> prove invaluable in the future.  When I had to work on AIX I kept a sheet
> like that handy but it is in the server room at work a few hours away.  Jack
> you have certainly taught me something new.  I was aware of man and info but
> the others are new to me.
>
> Again thanks so much for your fast responses.  Hopefully after a few
> months of this I can return the favor and help out some others.
>
>
> Jesse
>
> On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 9:15 PM, jack <tdldev at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > On Thu, 2008-03-06 at 19:33 -0500, Jesse Robertson wrote:
> > > Hello all,
> > >
> > > I am probably about the lowliest of linux users out there.  At one
> > > point I had learned some command line when I had to work with AIX and
> > > Red Hat but now I am looking to put together a hylafax server on a
> > > ubuntu server.  I have ubuntu server installed and am basically
> > > waiting on my multitech modem to arrive.  The problem is that my
> > > knowledge was poor to begin with and now it is pretty much forgotten.
> > > So a crash course on command line linux would be really helpful.  Does
> > > anyone know of a decent one you can point me too?
> > >
> > > Thanks for your assistance.
> > >
> > > Jesse
> > >
> >
>

Jesse
> > Linux is as friendly as can be in this respect - there are three command
> > line 'helpers' available to you in the OS itself.
> > man <whatever> = will bring up (man)ual pages, if there is such a thing.
> > info <whatever> = sort of like man, but sometimes much more data is
> > available.
> > apropos <whatever> = give it s subject, keyword, or whatever you can
> > think of. If there's a Linux command which might be in the ballpark,
> > apropos will throw it out as a possible.
> >
> > There is also locate (or slocate, if you have installed that). locate
> > <whatever> will show you if something is there, and where. if you use a
> > few simple expressions, like locate apa*, it will locate anything
> > beginning with apa...
> >
> > once you find the command with locate or apropos, you can then man (or
> > info) that command name and get the manual pages for it. Beyond that,
> > googling for the commands can sometimes give more tips and tricks on
> > their usage.
> >
> > Outside of that, google for Linux commandline will turn up tons of hits,
> > so I'd start with my own system and work out from there. There's always
> > us here on the list. If you need to do something, fire off a question of
> > what you'd like to do - I'm sure there's a few of us here that can point
> > you in a good direction.
> >
> > > --
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> >
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>
>
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>
Hey,
  A few things...
  apropos is a synonym for `man -k`, I find the latter easier to type but
ymmv.

  Ubuntu has a nifty feature whereby if you type in a command for a program
that isn't installed it will help you out:
owen at boiler:~$ mozilla
The program 'mozilla' is currently not installed. You can install it by
typing:
sudo apt-get install firefox
-bash: mozilla: command not found

  On package
management: apt-get, apt-cache, etc are great but if you're after a
more gui like option there's `aptitude` which is a nice front end.

  If you decide to try an X install then there's another front end,
synaptic.

  Comming from AIX you're probably going to miss smitty, the closest thing
to it is probably webmin or ebox which provide much of the same
functionality but as a web site.
  If you're used to AIX's ksh then there's pdksh which is a public domain
version.
  If you want an (almost) equiv to `lsdev` try installing `lshw`. It's not
the same, but it's usable and useful.
  Linux has LVM as well, it's not the same as IBM's
implementation, though is great to use. One main difference is the lack of
native support for mirrored pps. That is instead handled by `mdadm` software
raid (0,1,4,5,6,10).

  If you get caught, feel free to ask.
cheers,
Owen.
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