How does one clean a messy fstab ?

Neil hok.krat at gmail.com
Mon Apr 14 14:27:35 UTC 2008


On Mon, Apr 14, 2008 at 2:40 PM, SYNass IT Ubuntu / Linux
<i-ubux at synass.net> wrote:
>
>
>  Hi Neil,
>  Thanks for your feedback and appreciated offer ! ;-)
>  Last night I checked with my wife entry for entry and we had 2 more
>  different UUID's ...
>  ... may be I was too tired !? ;-|
>  However today I only found the two WIN partition UUID entries missing
>  and something very specific with /dev/sda6:
>
>  blkid shows UUID=E1C688 ... etc and another
>  displays it as UUID=0E1C688 ... etc !?
>
>  May be one more mistake of myself ...
>  ... or was it drag'n drop with "E1C688 ...etc !? ;-(
>
>  Below here are my blkid and fstab.
>  I grouped fstab to get a better overview and recognition of the
>  partitions plus its respective data.
>  I also started to fill the assumed respective data for /dev/sda6 & 7 !!
>
>  --------------------------------
>  sna at WS222:~$ blkid
>  /dev/sda1: UUID="D2C47460C47448AD" LABEL="WS222C_120GB" TYPE="ntfs"
>  /dev/sda5: LABEL="WS222_Ubuntu 7.1"
>  UUID="edf0353d-b99b-41d6-b7aa-57fad83fab35" SEC_TYPE="ext2" TYPE="ext3"
>  /dev/sda6: UUID="E1C68841C686923" LABEL="WS222D_ATA" TYPE="ntfs"
>  /dev/sda7: SEC_TYPE="msdos" LABEL="WS222E_XOS" UUID="47F7-9B3D"
>  TYPE="vfat"
>  /dev/sda8: TYPE="swap" UUID="42b8c729-4ccd-447e-9220-5797808f4740"
>  /dev/sda9: UUID="a27937eb-32e3-4774-88bd-27166fb722ea" SEC_TYPE="ext2"
>  TYPE="ext3" LABEL="WU144_HOME"
>  sna at WS222:~$
>  --------------------------------
>  # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
>  #
>  # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
>  proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
>  # /dev/sda5
>  UUID=edf0353d-b99b-41d6-b7aa-57fad83fab35       /               ext3
>  defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
>  #----------
>  # /dev/sda1
>  UUID=D2C47460C47448AD /media/sda1     ntfs    defaults,umask=007,gid=46
>  0       1
>  #----------
>  # >> /dev/sdb6 / NTFS D: Data Windows Partition
>  # UUID=E1C68841C686923  ?       ntfs    ?       ?       ?
>  #----------
>  # /dev/sda7 / FAT16 E: Data Exchange Partition (for tests only and 1GB)
>  # UUID=47F7-9B3D                        ?       vfat    ?       ?       ?
>  #----------
>  # /dev/sda8
>  UUID="42b8c729-4ccd-447e-9220-43b0-5797808f4740 none            swap
>  sw              0       0
>  #----------
>  # /dev/sda9
>  UUID=a27937eb-32e3-4774-88bd-27166fb722ea       /home   ext3    0       2
>  #----------
>  /dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec 0       0
>  #----------
>  /dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec 0       0
>  --------------------------------
>
>  TIA for your assistance to get back a clean /cleared and proper
>  constellation ! ;-D
>  If it helps or if needed I made a set of files from my UUIDcomp script.
>  Let me know if you need / want more info to check !?
>
>  Cheers, svobi
>

Hi Svobi

Are all of those lines in fstab commented out???? (# at the beginning
of the line. It means it will not be used) Or is this a poblem caused
in the copy?

ALWAYS BACK THE FSTAB UP BEFORE EDITING. Your PC works, so back the
shit up before you start editing it. A "cp /etc/fstab
/etc/fstab.backup" would do just fine.

Before you reboot the PC you should make the directories you will be
using. If you take all my advices you should do this:
mkdir /media/WinC && mkdir /media/WinD && mkdir /media/test

I'd advise to set
"# UUID=D2C47460C47448AD /media/sda1     ntfs
defaults,umask=007,gid=46  0       1" (most probably your windows C
disk)
to
"UUID=D2C47460C47448AD /media/WinC   ntfs    defaults,umask=007,gid=46
 0       1"
because sda1 is in windows recognised as C:/. This is not essential,
but may help to find your files. You should NOT do this if you use
virtualisation. I do not know if it causes problems, but it may.

and
>> /dev/sdb6 / NTFS D: Data Windows Partition
# UUID=E1C68841C686923  ?       ntfs    ?       ?       ?
to
# /dev/sdb6 / NTFS D: Data Windows Partition
"UUID=E1C68841C686923  /media/WinD     ntfs    defaults       0       0"
The data partition in windows wasn't mounted. This results in the data
not being available

and
# /dev/sda7 / FAT16 E: Data Exchange Partition (for tests only and 1GB)
# UUID=47F7-9B3D                        ?       vfat    ?       ?       ?
to
# /dev/sda7 / FAT16 E: Data Exchange Partition (for tests only and 1GB)
UUID=47F7-9B3D                        /media/test       vfat    noauto
      0       0
or
# /dev/sda7 / FAT16 E: Data Exchange Partition (for tests only and 1GB)
UUID=47F7-9B3D                        /media/test       vfat
defaults       0       0

Again, the disk wasn't mounted. If you do not want it to be mounted at
boot you should use the first (noauto) if you do want it to be mounted
you should use the second (default)
The numbers in the last part of each entry are meant for the error
checks. I am not sure wether Linux can check your NTFS disks for
errors, so I'd advise you to use 0 (do not check).
The #'s are there to prevent the fstab read program from erroring
because it can't read the line.

I do not work with UUID's myself, always found the /dev/sd[a-z] quite
sufficient, but it seems the a-z can change at when a new drive is
added at a Sata or Pata port with a lower identifier (if a mater IDE
channel 1 drive is added this will always happen) so it may be better
to work with UUID's.

Neil

>
>
>
>  > --
>  > There are two kinds of people:
>  > 1. People who start their arrays with 1.
>  > 1. People who start their arrays with 0.
>
>  HaHaHa ...
>  ... I am using both arrays !
>  My emotional brain / as human starts the array with 1 !
>  My rational brain / as organizer starts the array with 0 !
>  ;-))

Then you must be schiofrenic.......:P:P:P (no insult intended)

>
>
>  --
>
>
> ubuntu-users mailing list
>  ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
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>



-- 
There are two kinds of people:
1. People who start their arrays with 1.
1. People who start their arrays with 0.




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