How does one clean a messy fstab ?

SYNass IT Ubuntu / Linux i-ubux at synass.net
Mon Apr 14 12:40:01 UTC 2008


On Mon, 2008-04-14 at 13:34 +0200, Neil wrote:
> On Mon, Apr 14, 2008 at 11:35 AM, SYNass IT Ubuntu / Linux
> <i-ubux at synass.net> wrote:
> >
> >  On Mon, 2008-04-14 at 07:43 +0200, Nils Kassube wrote:
> >  > SYNass IT Ubuntu / Linux wrote:
> >  > > Currently I need your assistance / help how to clean my fstab best and
> >  > > easiest:
> >  > > Lucky, the system starts and runs and seems not to have any acute
> >  > > problems. ;-)
> >  >
> >  > Hmm, I don't understand, what your problem with your fstab really is. If
> >  > the system runs as it should, what is wrong?
> >  > Nils
> >
> >
> >  Hi Nils,
> >  Thanks for your concerns ! ;-)
> >
> >  After a week plus a weekend with very intensive experiments with my
> >  partitioning and many re-considerations how to prepare my future
> >  Multi-OS-Setup I have some minor differences in my blkid / fstab /
> >  drives & mounts with FAT & NTFS drives.
> >
> >  I know I can set these /dev/sdax ...
> >  ... but I would like to have these setup properly with their respective
> >  UUID's ;-))
> >
> >  On the other hand I also learnt something important and interesting
> >  about the sequencing of these multiple OS partitions: Adding or deleting
> >  some partitions change the "relative" pointer to their partitions and it
> >  will not start properly anymore if I forget to change menu.lst and/or
> >  fstab !?
> >
> >  So for now I wanted to find out the best, correct and easiest way to
> >  adjust, clean / clear/maintain these important system files (menu.lst,
> >  fstab etc !?) resp to find out which of them are changed properly
> >  dynamic from system and which ones need manual adjustments !?
> >
> >  Just to learn & find out this cycle of relations. ;-D
> >
> >  Cheers, svobi
> >
> 
> Could you please post your fstab, then we could see what can be
> changed (optimised/cleaned) and tell you what to do if you add a drive
> and / or change your partitioning.
> 
> Usually, even in a multiboot environment, the partitioner will see all
> the available partitions and can help you write fstab and create
> partitions. This means you shouldn't need to see fstab, ever. Windoze
> will recognise your new partitions if they are Fat32 (not Reiser, XFS,
> Ext, NFS or most others. Just Fat and NTFS)
> 
> However if you prefer to do things manually you can, and I and a few
> with me will help you to the extend of our knowledge.
> 
> Neil
> >  --
> >  ubuntu-users mailing list
> >  ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
> >  Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users




Hi Neil, 
Thanks for your feedback and appreciated offer ! ;-)
Last night I checked with my wife entry for entry and we had 2 more
different UUID's ...
... may be I was too tired !? ;-|
However today I only found the two WIN partition UUID entries missing
and something very specific with /dev/sda6: 

blkid shows UUID=E1C688 ... etc and another 
displays it as UUID=0E1C688 ... etc !?

May be one more mistake of myself ...
... or was it drag'n drop with "E1C688 ...etc !? ;-(

Below here are my blkid and fstab.
I grouped fstab to get a better overview and recognition of the
partitions plus its respective data.
I also started to fill the assumed respective data for /dev/sda6 & 7 !!

--------------------------------
sna at WS222:~$ blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="D2C47460C47448AD" LABEL="WS222C_120GB" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda5: LABEL="WS222_Ubuntu 7.1"
UUID="edf0353d-b99b-41d6-b7aa-57fad83fab35" SEC_TYPE="ext2" TYPE="ext3" 
/dev/sda6: UUID="E1C68841C686923" LABEL="WS222D_ATA" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sda7: SEC_TYPE="msdos" LABEL="WS222E_XOS" UUID="47F7-9B3D"
TYPE="vfat" 
/dev/sda8: TYPE="swap" UUID="42b8c729-4ccd-447e-9220-5797808f4740" 
/dev/sda9: UUID="a27937eb-32e3-4774-88bd-27166fb722ea" SEC_TYPE="ext2"
TYPE="ext3" LABEL="WU144_HOME" 
sna at WS222:~$ 
--------------------------------
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
# /dev/sda5
UUID=edf0353d-b99b-41d6-b7aa-57fad83fab35	/               ext3
defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
#----------
# /dev/sda1
UUID=D2C47460C47448AD /media/sda1     ntfs    defaults,umask=007,gid=46
0       1
#----------
# >> /dev/sdb6 / NTFS D: Data Windows Partition
# UUID=E1C68841C686923 	?	ntfs	?	?	?
#----------
# /dev/sda7 / FAT16 E: Data Exchange Partition (for tests only and 1GB) 
# UUID=47F7-9B3D			?	vfat	?	?	?
#----------
# /dev/sda8
UUID="42b8c729-4ccd-447e-9220-43b0-5797808f4740	none            swap
sw              0       0
#----------
# /dev/sda9
UUID=a27937eb-32e3-4774-88bd-27166fb722ea	/home	ext3	0	2
#----------
/dev/scd0	/media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec 0       0
#----------
/dev/fd0	/media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec 0       0
--------------------------------

TIA for your assistance to get back a clean /cleared and proper
constellation ! ;-D
If it helps or if needed I made a set of files from my UUIDcomp script.
Let me know if you need / want more info to check !?

Cheers, svobi




> -- 
> There are two kinds of people:
> 1. People who start their arrays with 1.
> 1. People who start their arrays with 0.

HaHaHa ...
... I am using both arrays ! 
My emotional brain / as human starts the array with 1 !
My rational brain / as organizer starts the array with 0 !
;-))





More information about the ubuntu-users mailing list