Remote X?

Yoram darak at unikaas.xs4all.nl
Mon Mar 27 13:34:37 UTC 2006


On Sun, Mar 26, 2006 at 07:49:46PM -0600, Gromitigo wrote:
> Thank you for the very detailed response!
> After a couple of conversations, I think i'll just use the remote
> desktop that comes with it (i was unaware it was there when I wrote
> in).
> It'll be a fileserver.  Old PC, won't have monitor, keyboard, etc.
> Knowthing that, do you have any suggestions?  For instance, to do
> certain things at startup?  Not sure what script gets run when you
> boot...when you log in to X, does it run you .bash file?
> 
> On 3/26/06, Alan McKinnon <alan at linuxholdings.co.za> wrote:
> > On Sunday 26 March 2006 18:43, Gromitigo wrote:
> > > Is there a way to view the desktop over the network like VNC?
> > > I'm wanting to set up a ubuntu server but it won't have a monitor,
> > > keyboard, etc.
> > > The maching I'll be using to connect from is running WinXP.
> > > I need a way to get to the GUI, telneting to the command line to do
> > > things on the server isn't an option for what I need it to do.
> >
> > You have three options:
> >
> > 1. Export the entire desktop to the XP machine using VNC. There are a
> > whole range of clients and servers to choose from on both Linux and
> > XP. With this method you get a Window on the XP box and inside this
> > window is an Ubuntu desktop, complete with all running apps, menus,
> > panels, etc. You connect from the Windows machine using VNC and away
> > you go.
> >
> > 2. Run individual apps on the Ubuntu machine, and instead of them
> > being displayed on it's local screen using the local keyboard and
> > mouse, the app displays on the XP machine. This is called X
> > forwarding and is a built in feature of X (the gui portion of Linux).
> > To do this you need to have an X-server running on the Windows
> > machine - CygWin is one choice, there are others. This method runs
> > one Linux app in a Windows window as opposed to the entire desktop.
> > Using PuTty on the Windows machine, you connect to the Ubuntu machine
> > and login. Then start the Ubuntu app and send it's display to the
> > Windows machine.
> >
> > 3. Terminal server. Unless oyu need many clients, this is probably
> > overdone for your needs.
> >
> > Which of these options suits your needs best?

Maybe just a stupid question, but if it is going to be a file server,
why use X?
When you login using ssh, it should run the same files as if you were
logging in from a normal terminal (it is an interactive session). When
you log into X, it doesnt read any .bash file, but it does when you open
a terminal.

For startup scripts, have a look into /etc/rc2.d (the default runlevel
in ubuntu is 2).

> >
> > --
> > Alan McKinnon
> > alan at linuxholdings dot co dot za
> > +27 82, double three seven, one nine three five
> >
> > --
> > ubuntu-users mailing list
> > ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
> >
> 
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