[Ubuntu-us-ok] Promoting Ubuntu in rural areas

Devin Venable venable.devin at gmail.com
Thu May 19 18:22:02 UTC 2011


Hey folks.  Today I decided the time has come to look for a new place
to work.  I've been fortunate enough to work with companies running
Ubuntu (or at least Linux) in the Tulsa area for the last 5 years.  I
hope I can keep it up.  If anyone knows of any web or enterprise
opportunities, please let me know!

Thanks,
Devin

On Wed, May 18, 2011 at 10:35 AM, derrick parkhurst
<derrick.parkhurst at gmail.com> wrote:
> It's not rural, but we would be glad to provide a free space to do
> something like this at okcCoCo (http://okccoco.com). I'm sure some of
> us in the LUGnuts (http://okclugnuts.org) would be willing to help
> too.
>
> Derrick
>
>
> --
> Derrick Parkhurst, Ph.D.
> @thirtysixthspan
> (405) 596-4697
> derrick.parkhurst at gmail.com
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> On Wed, May 18, 2011 at 8:04 AM, Devin Venable <venable.devin at gmail.com> wrote:
>> It sounds like an ambitious project but a good idea nonetheless if you
>> can find the manpower and resources to pull it off.  Here's one way
>> you could do it, alone possibly.  You would need a public space, a
>> computer, and some means of projecting to video or overhead.  Maybe a
>> public library or church.  You would need to promote the event as a
>> way for businesses to save money.  Maybe make signs, garage sale
>> style, that say something like "Save your business thousands using
>> free software.  Free seminar to learn how," along with a time, date
>> and place.  Perhaps you would pass out flyers to local businesses.
>> Don't be surprised if people look at you like you're crazy though.
>>
>> At the seminar I would show them how to download the ISO, burn it, and
>> then install on a computer that has Windows. Show them how to dual
>> boot, as that's probably the best choice for new users who have no
>> knowledge of Linux.  Then once the installation is complete, reboot,
>> and show them the office and productivity software.  Be sure to
>> highlight how easy it was to get on the web which (hopefully) will
>> require no special configuration.  Show them the web.  If business
>> users see that they have access to Office tools, plus the web, all for
>> free, they'll likely be sold.  Also open up Synaptic Package Manager
>> and show them that there are 1000s of other software packages to
>> choose from.
>>
>> Well that's it for my brainstorm.  Good luck with it.
>>
>> Devin
>>
>> On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 5:25 PM, Anthony Papillion <papillion at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Hey Everyone,
>>>
>>> So I've been thinking a lot over the last few days about different ways
>>> to promote Ubuntu within rural areas. I live in a rural area (Miami) and
>>> I can tell you that Ubuntu (or even Linux in general) is hardly known
>>> here at all. Just about *everything* is Windows and people look at you
>>> like you're from another planet when you say you don't run Windows.
>>>
>>> "Oooh, you're a Mac user, huh? My sister has one of those!" is the
>>> response I commonly get. Then I go through the complicated explanation
>>> that there are other operating systems besides Windows and Mac and the
>>> next question is "So...it's a version of Windows? Like Windows Ubuntu?"
>>>
>>> Obviously, this is an education problem here. I worked in Walmart
>>> electronics for a few years and I can't tell you the money I saw people
>>> waste on Windows and Windows software. Money that I knew they couldn't
>>> afford but needed the software to get school work done or finances, or
>>> other 'must have's'.
>>>
>>> So I'm trying to put together an initiative to help introduce people to
>>> Ubuntu. When I was a Microsoft partner, we used to do this kind of stuff
>>> all the time but then we had quite a bit of money behind us. Since that
>>> isn't the case here, I'm turning to the LoCo community for help.
>>>
>>> What can we do to help introduce new people to Ubuntu? I'm talking more
>>> than just "go download the iso and see what you think" or handing them a
>>> CD and giving them a "good luck" smile. I want to get my hands dirty. I
>>> want to really push the benefits of Ubuntu to rural communities,
>>> municipalities, and businesses.
>>>
>>> Ideas? Thoughts? Anyone wanna participate?
>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>> Anthony
>>> Ph. (918)320-9968
>>>
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