[CoLoCo] Linksys Router

Jim Hutchinson jim at ubuntu-rocks.org
Mon Oct 8 21:54:02 BST 2007


Mitch,

Thanks. I've looked at that before but never had the nerve to install
it. I guess I'm confused as to what I gain. Do I need to install a
software client to update DynDNS or will the router do it all for me
automagically?

Jim

On 10/8/07, Mitch Mahan <mitch at kci.net> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Jim,
>
> http://dd-wrt.com
>
>
>
> This one supports the newer routers (and has all the functionality you can
> ask for).
>
>
>
>  ________________________________
>
>
> From: ubuntu-us-co-bounces at lists.ubuntu.com
> [mailto:ubuntu-us-co-bounces at lists.ubuntu.com] On Behalf Of
> Dave Vanderploeg
>  Sent: Monday, October 08, 2007 2:18 PM
>  To: Ubuntu Colorado Local Community Team
>  Subject: Re: [CoLoCo] REMOTE SERVER
>
>
>
> Jim,
>
>  any chance you have a WRT54G? http://hyperwrt.org/
>
>
> On 10/8/07, Jim Hutchinson < jim at ubuntu-rocks.org> wrote:
>
> Kevin,
>
>  Just curious. You mentioned that the linksys router has support
>  dynamic dns built in. does that mean that I can set up something like
>  jim at gotdns.org and have the linksys update that address when my IP
>  changes? I've been looking at the software for doing this but it's not
>  simple. My linksys is a couple years old. Do I need to or should I
>  update the firmware?
>
>  Thanks.
>  Jim
>
>  On 10/8/07, Kevin Fries <kfries at cctus.com> wrote:
>  >
>  > On Mon, 2007-10-08 at 11:24 -0600, Jim Hutchinson wrote:
>  > > For passwords there is a program you can install on Ubuntu that makes
>  > > "random" passwords. I forget the program though. Maybe someone else
>  > > knows.
>  > >
>  > > A trick I use is to create a random prefix and suffix and sandwich
>  > > something memorable between. for example:
>  > >
>  > > prefix = 6$Y
>  > > suffix = G!9
>  > > my gmail password = 6$YgoogG!9
>  > > my yahoo password = 6$YyahoG!9
>  > >
>  > > and so on. Btw, those are examples so have fun hacking my mail. I
>  > > don't know if those are more or less secure since you are repeating
>  > > part of your password everywhere but it makes it easy to remember.
>  >
>  > Always remember, tricks like this make it tougher to guess.  The reason
>  > behind the old upper case, lower case, number and special character is
>  > to increase the number of characters needed to crack your password.  The
>  > more character sets, the lower the odds of guessing it.  But remember,
>  > someone is always winning the lottery, and their odds were just as long.
>  > With the speed of modern computers, this can be a real issue.  It just
>  > does not take as long to crack passwords as it used to.
>  >
>  > For email and programs that can not be secured via a private encryption
>  > key, these tools are the best you have.  But the OP wanted access to the
>  > box to admin or fix problems.  In these cases, eliminating ssh passwords
>  > all together eliminates even the lucky shot in the dark.  Besides, its
>  > actually easier to setup SSH to do things in a more secure way, than it
>  > is to set up all those access rights.  Ubuntu actually accepts keys in
>  > its default configuration, all you have to do is turn passwords to no.
>  >
>  > To the OP, trust me, set up the keys...
>  >
>  > If that is too easy, and you are bored, make it harder in a more
>  > constructive way.  For instance, if you ran Webmin on that server box,
>  > set it up to only respond to localhost.  Then setup your laptop so that
>  > xinetd listens on port 10001 (leaving 10000 to webmin your local box).
>  > Have xinetd start the SSH tunnel, automatically when you hit that port.
>  > With the keys enabled, webmin would come up from your machine(s) and
>  > only your machine(s) and handle the security silently in the background.
>  > >From a web browser, localhost:10001 should be your remote server.  Even
>  > this exercise is easier than that original linux.com post.
>  >
>  >
>  > --
>  > Kevin Fries
>  > Senior Linux Engineer
>  > Computer and Communications Technology, Inc
>  > A Division of Japan Communications Inc.
>  >
>  > --
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