This is a small corner of a very big issue, and there's nothing childish about the argument.<div><br></div><div>I suspect the intent here, when the decision was made to omit the opt-in setup, was to simplify the user setup experience. For most people, most of the time, this relatively benign "spyware" is not an issue.<div>
And amazon's targeted ads & results provide a penny-stream that helps feed Canonical, and seems innocuous.</div><div><br></div><div>But it's stepping over a line from purity of purpose to commercial data-mining, and deserves at least a first-time-use dialog. RMS reminds us that we're dipping a toe in a very deep swamp here, and the best time to discuss the issues is before we get even a little wet. Because it's a very slippery slope into malicious code & eavesdropping, to espionage & censorship, and past this point _none_ of the players is totally honest.</div>
<div>When Walls_have_Ears, remember Amnesty International's unsettling reminder that Ears_have_Walls.†</div></div><div>Google.com's DoNoEvil policy reminds us, by their need to state it, that 3rd-party search invites evil.</div>
<div>SSL reduces risks along the plumbing, but cannot offer any guarantees about the endpoint.</div><div>†</div><div>Maybe it's a good policy for Ubuntu, and other like-minded distros & products, to pop up a one-time dialog here, _before_ opting in to some data-mining on the user's behalf.</div>
<div>The GPL Preamble has the right texture (but quite different subject matter) - it's an opportunity to point out the difference (which 12.10 seems to have erased) between commercial & truly free behavior.</div>
<div>Perhaps</div><div>† "Do you want to use external search engines, which may result in your search being visible</div><div>† †to other parties?</div><div>† †Some software trades your privacy for external services, for example by giving you search results,</div>
<div>† †but other parties some indication of what _you_ are looking for, often bringing†paid advertising to you.</div><div>† †Sometimes your privacy is critical, so we strive never to do this without offering to warn you.</div>
<div>† †.</div><div>† †When such an exchange of privacy for service is taking place, do you want to ...</div><div>† †[ ] allow queries to be sent off-machine</div><div>† †[ ] restrict searches to local machine only</div><div>
† †[ ] allow external queries, but only via an "anonymising" service</div><div>† †[*] ask me each time</div><div>† †"</div><div><br></div><div>Forgive me if I'm re-covering old ground here - I didn't notice the opt-in/out dialog of the Ubuntu <= 12.04 dash, and security of search here isn't a big issue for me. †But it's a breach of trust in what I naively assumed: that the free (as in speech) nature of the software also implied free (as in beer).</div>
<div>When my keystrokes are buying someone else a pint by being sold, some small freedom is eroded.</div><div>But it's more than spilled beer when that backchannel can be exploited to watch all my search keystrokes, by compromising a different machine, downstream in a search service I didn't even know I was consulting</div>
<div><br></div><div>-paranoid pete</div><div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 10:23 PM, Grant Bowman <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:grantbow@ubuntu.com" target="_blank">grantbow@ubuntu.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 9:55 PM, Jono Bacon <<a href="mailto:jono@ubuntu.com">jono@ubuntu.com</a>> wrote:<br>

</div><div class="im">> On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 9:27 PM, Grant Bowman <<a href="mailto:grantbow@ubuntu.com">grantbow@ubuntu.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>> For discussion:<br>
>> <a href="http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/07/on-richard-stallman-and-ubuntu/" target="_blank">http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/07/on-richard-stallman-and-ubuntu/</a><br>
>><br>
>> I am trying to reserve judgement but the 12.10 install I tried seemed<br>
>> to sacrifice privacy a little too easily and I don't like the idea of<br>
>> money being made by default from Ubuntu for Canonical. At the same<br>
>> time I don't agree with all of what RMS said but some of what he says<br>
>> is true for me. <a href="http://www.fsf.org/blogs/rms/ubuntu-spyware-what-to-do" target="_blank">http://www.fsf.org/blogs/rms/ubuntu-spyware-what-to-do</a><br>
>><br>
>> What do you think?<br>
><br>
><br>
> "I don't like the idea of money being made by default from Ubuntu for<br>
> Canonical"<br>
><br>
> What is the objection about Canonical making money in Ubuntu given the<br>
> millions of dollars invested into Ubuntu?<br>
<br>
</div>I think trust is the primary issue.<br>
<br>
First, that was a partial quote of a sentence and I think not the most<br>
important aspect of this whole debate. Second, I didn't express that<br>
particular sentiment accurately. Perhaps it would be more clear with<br>
an appended "in this way." I am not alone in feeling this particular<br>
implementation crosses a line of trust. Perhaps as you say Canonical<br>
"didnít get it 100% right". That's why I am trying to reserve<br>
judgement despite it being released in a non LTS version inserted at<br>
the last minute from what I heard. If Canonical had submitted a<br>
similar feature to Debian do you suspect it would have gotten accepted<br>
or is Canonical somehow abusing it's specially entrusted power? People<br>
trust this environment because it is level and open. This feature as<br>
implemented so far is neither.<br>
<br>
Other entities including but not limited to the EFF have expressed<br>
their concerns pretty well.<br>
<a href="https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks" target="_blank">https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks</a><br>
<br>
Where is the money coming from? Facebook, Twitter, BBC, Amazon and<br>
other third parties of Canonical's choosing, right? This is done by<br>
keylogging "send your keystrokes" from all the searches on a default<br>
install with no notice to end users, right? Making money from work one<br>
does is what Canonical has carefully done in the past. I believe<br>
Canonical is trying to find the balance and is doing a better job than<br>
anyone else I think in this regard.<br>
<br>
I hope this discussion can stay on topic and not get derailed by my<br>
misstating my position on that one point.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Grant<br>
<br>
--<br>
Ubuntu-us-ca mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Ubuntu-us-ca@lists.ubuntu.com">Ubuntu-us-ca@lists.ubuntu.com</a><br>
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: <a href="https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-us-ca" target="_blank">https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-us-ca</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>-pete<br>
</div>