On Tue, Jun 16, 2009 at 3:56 PM, Rob Beard <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rob@esdelle.co.uk">rob@esdelle.co.uk</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
such as <a href="http://EfficientPC.co.uk" target="_blank">EfficientPC.co.uk</a> or <a href="http://LinuxEmportium.co.uk" target="_blank">LinuxEmportium.co.uk</a> or just a Windows<br>
based laptop from Comet or somewhere and install Linux yourself).</blockquote><div><br>What actually annoys me a little is that if manufacturers would actually stick to the same components etc. for the entire life of a model we could quite easily list the laptops available which have no issues with hardware in Ubuntu.<br>
<br>The problem is that they don&#39;t always!<br><br>Toshiba was particularly bad in that way when myself and my neighbour (the legendary Martin Wheeler - I&#39;m sure some will know him, quite an enigma ;-)) bought &quot;the same laptop&quot; in Bristol and Yeovil at almost the same time.  Despite the &quot;specification&quot; being virtually identical (I think his had a little less memory) our experiences installing Ubuntu (Warty - pioneers!) were quite different.  It&#39;s a long time ago, and I was a bit of a novice at the time, but clearly the components inside were not identical.<br>
<br>The laptops I have at the moment were bought from Currys and from Tesco and are both HP/Compaq.  Have not really had too many challenges to overcome, to be honest.  Generally when things have failed it&#39;s been my fault rather than the hardware and/or the OS.  Deleting the wrong things, or trying to be too ambitious.<br>
<br>Sean<br></div></div>