<div>sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>then select KDE as environment when you&#39;re logging in. You&#39;ll be asked if you want it to be your default: you can say &quot;just this time&quot; and experiment away. <br><br>&nbsp;</div>
<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 5/25/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Ian Pascoe</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:softy.lofty.ilp@btinternet.com">softy.lofty.ilp@btinternet.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">Hi Folks<br><br>Up to now I&#39;ve been a dedicated follower of Gnome, well almost a year now,<br>and thought it&#39;d be fun to try KDE and maybe a couple of the other esoteric
<br>desktops out there.<br><br>My question is what is the best way to, initially, have both KDE and Gnome<br>on the same PC without them trying to interfere with one another.<br><br>My initial thoughts were to set up a new user specifically for KDE but I
<br>don&#39;t know if that&#39;d work, or indeed whether when doing things like updating<br>if the system would get it&#39;s nickers in a twist trying to update both<br>desktops.&nbsp;&nbsp;And for that matter, when I&#39;ve had enough of one particular
<br>desktop and removed it, would it also remove dependencies required by the<br>other(s).<br><br>Actually, having written this down, the logical thing to do would be to have<br>two totally seperate installations, but I don&#39;t know!
<br><br>Thoughts?<br><br>Ian<br><br><br><br>--<br><a href="mailto:ubuntu-uk@lists.ubuntu.com">ubuntu-uk@lists.ubuntu.com</a><br><a href="https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-uk">https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-uk
</a><br><a href="https://wiki.kubuntu.org/UKTeam/">https://wiki.kubuntu.org/UKTeam/</a><br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all">