<p dir="ltr">I really wouldn't like to dual boot win10 and Ubuntu Studio as last time I did this after many boots and OS switches Windows corrupted </p>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Jul 27, 2016 11:39 AM, "Ross Gammon" <<a href="mailto:rosco2@ubuntu.com">rosco2@ubuntu.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi Matthew,<br>
<br>
Welcome to the team!<br>
<br>
On 07/27/2016 03:10 AM, Matthew Bearson wrote:<br>
> I recently reinstalled my copy of Win 10 onto my laptop and never got to<br>
> the point of reinstalling, in anyone's opinion should I just buy a<br>
> VMWare Workstation license, download Virtualbox, or reinstall Ubuntu Studio?<br>
<br>
It depends!<br>
<br>
To really/deeply test audio/video applications in Ubuntu Studio, you<br>
really need Ubuntu Studio properly installed on your hard disk so you<br>
are directly connected to audio hardware, and graphics drivers etc.<br>
<br>
You can install Ubuntu Studio alongside Windows 10 if you wish. There is<br>
plenty of advice on the internet about how to do this (it involves<br>
shrinking Windows 10 to make space - or an extra hard-disk).<br>
<br>
A lot of us have a machine that has a stable (older) version of Ubuntu<br>
Studio for doing creative work, and another machine that runs the<br>
developer version (currently Yakkety - to become 16.10) of Ubuntu Studio<br>
for testing the latest stuff.<br>
<br>
You can install multiple versions of Ubuntu Studio alongside each other,<br>
but this is a bit risky if some bug in the testing version causes your<br>
"creative" version to break or stop booting (just when you have that<br>
creative itch).<br>
<br>
I make heavy use of Virtual Box. You don't need a license for that. I<br>
have 32 and 64 bit versions of all the supported Ubuntu Studio releases,<br>
and the developer versions installed in Virtual Box. This makes it very<br>
easy to take a snapshot, or make a clone of the virtual machine, install<br>
test packages, test away, and then delete the clone, or restore the<br>
snapshot if I break something.<br>
<br>
But you can't always reproduce all bugs in a VM, sometimes the bugs only<br>
exist in the VM, and some applications just don't work properly (or at<br>
the correct speed) within a VM.<br>
<br>
I hope that helps. Just sing out if you need more help.<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
<br>
Ross<br>
<br>
<br>
--<br>
ubuntu-studio-devel mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:ubuntu-studio-devel@lists.ubuntu.com">ubuntu-studio-devel@lists.ubuntu.com</a><br>
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: <a href="https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-devel" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-devel</a><br>
</blockquote></div></div>