[ubuntu-marketing] ubuntu-marketing Digest, Vol 29, Issue 18

Randy Fisher wikirandy at yahoo.com
Mon Mar 24 19:45:15 GMT 2008


Hi,

Pertaining to marketing, I think a Ubuntu LiveCD should be a must-have for anyone operating a computer. It has saved my bacon, and I am so pleased that I even knew it existed. In fact, from that experience, I have decided to join this list, and offer my 2 cents, and also to see if I can figure out the IRC thing, for tomorrow's meeting.

The point is, that the LiveCD is a great way for people to know something about Ubuntu, and for it to demonstrate its incredible value - at a time when people are most vulnerable (losing their pc). It also represents safety, reliability and security - in a way that doesn't exist with current software systems. As their interest is peaked, they are more likely to want to know more - as I do - about how Ubuntu can work for them.

I also think that Ubuntu is an excellent resource for seniors - who are typically scared of computers...and don't need all the bells and whistles, and the fanciest PC's to run their applications - which generally run email, Internet and word processing.

- Randy
 
________
Randy Fisher - aka "WikiRandy for WikiEducator"
http://www.wikieducator.org/User:Wikirandy
Vancouver, BC
+1 604.684.2275

www.icentronetworks.com
www.hirerandy.com


Skype / Gmail / Yahoo: wikirandy

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Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 12:00:17 PM
Subject: ubuntu-marketing Digest, Vol 29, Issue 18

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Today's Topics:

   1.  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Dylan McCall)
   2. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Nick Ali)
   3. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Vid Ayer)
   4. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Corey Burger)
   5. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (M. Fioretti)
   6. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Paul Schulz)
   7. Re:  Promoting Ubuntu at libraries? (Chris Rowson)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2008 03:39:10 +0000
From: Dylan McCall <dylanmccall at gmail.com>
Subject: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID: <1206157150.18871.26.camel at dmccall-laptop>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Working for a short while in computer retail, I am growing more and more
crazy from how the concept of free software is essentially taboo in that
environment. While the reason why a computer retailer can not survive
with free software could be "explained" all people want, the essence of
that, and the fact that people are essentially trying to cover up
something as good and important as open source software, tells me that
there is something seriously broken here and it has to be fixed one way
or another. With Linux expanding so rapidly and really becoming a
positive thing for end users, businesses can't keep sweeping this under
the rug forever. Even with Linux platforms succeeding at being
invisible, the difference between that and the competition is obvious.
(There are lots of things people take for granted until they read about
them in the paper or see something reminding them on TV; Linux, unlike
certain other jarringly visible computer platforms, is one of those
things).

Obviously, the best way to stop those businesses trying to dodge Linux
is for people to start coming to their stores thinking about free
software. Maybe with enough attention going that way, they will develop
ways to work with it. That would be one big hurdle overcome in terms of
adoption! (Though I'm sure it's obvious to you guys, being the marketing
people and all).

....The obvious /realistic/ fix: Occasional promotion of Ubuntu at
community events, and with friends. ? I for one am personally helping
people with their Linux questions in the store I work at, which seems to
have developed a quiet increase in Linux-seeking customers...
Interestingly, even the people just looking in to Linux for the first
time - usually Ubuntu - seem quite excited about the idea, which I find
very cool.

Then, I realized that I should really think about promoting Ubuntu
properly (in an environment where promoting free software does not get
frowned upon) if I am so keen on it! One of few other local, popular
places keen on free knowledge is a library. Actually, that seems the
perfect place through which to promote Ubuntu, since a public library
has no big financial reliance on Microsoft's confounded business
strategy and is, in theory, all about knowledge. Their administration
and audience also leans very much to the socialist end of
things.? ??Lots of libraries hold small workshops and classes. The one
in my area even has an open bulletin board set up, which could prove
useful, if there was something worth posting there that didn't look like
spam...
(My only problem: $12 of accumulated late fees).

So, before I meander way off topic: I can't possibly be the only one who
has pondered promoting Ubuntu, in some way, at a public library. Any
experiences, examples, related stories, screams of terror or links? Feel
free to share!

Bye,
-Dylan McCall
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Message: 2
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2008 23:53:35 -0400
From: "Nick Ali" <nali at ubuntu.com>
Subject: Re: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID:
    <954321e10803212053j581c0177xd331fc53104a771d at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

On Fri, Mar 21, 2008 at 11:39 PM, Dylan McCall <dylanmccall at gmail.com> wrote:
>  So, before I meander way off topic: I can't possibly be the only one who
>  has pondered promoting Ubuntu, in some way, at a public library. Any
>  experiences, examples, related stories, screams of terror or links? Feel
>  free to share!

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuInLibraries

nick

-- 

http://boredandblogging.com



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2008 06:27:21 +0000
From: "Vid Ayer" <svaksha at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: "Dylan McCall" <dylanmccall at gmail.com>
Cc: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID:
    <12470af00803212327w29a6c0b6xea48755c99f2a0b4 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

On Sat, Mar 22, 2008 at 3:39 AM, Dylan McCall <dylanmccall at gmail.com> wrote:
> Working for a short while in computer retail, I am growing more and more
>  crazy from how the concept of free software is essentially taboo in that
>  environment. While the reason why a computer retailer can not survive
>  with free software could be "explained" all people want, the essence of

Talking of retailers, recently the big names from other countries have
opened shop in many a city in India and on a casual visit I saw some
machines on sale display sans any OS (had Free Dos actually).

I asked for a demo and (as I expected) he could not provide one so
that was my chance to ask him if he would load a GPL based OS if I
provided him the CD. He agreed and I came back with Ubuntu (of course
:-)), gave him an primer on what Gnu/Linux, Ubuntu, GPL, etc... was
all about, and asked him to sell it (and 2 other machines) with Ubuntu
installed.

Then, I got in touch with the branch manager and left some extra CD's
so he could give it to the other branches for installation. There
would be other customers who may come in to buy a machine and would be
curious when they see Ubuntu installed and are shown a practical demo
which I think is important to get folks hooked on to a Gnu/Linux on
the desktop.

Rather than just advocacy/spreading the word, a practical touch-N-feel
to see-it-work helps a lot more :-)

Vid
|| http://www.svaksha.com ||



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2008 23:59:34 -0700
From: "Corey Burger" <corey.burger at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID:
    <348bd6da0803212359p40bd6e8cw4b103e5a86d108a2 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

<snip>

>  So, before I meander way off topic: I can't possibly be the only one who
>  has pondered promoting Ubuntu, in some way, at a public library. Any
>  experiences, examples, related stories, screams of terror or links? Feel
>  free to share!

Others have pointed out the Ubuntu in Libraries project, which is a
great thing. I wanted to add a point I made when the idea of promoting
Ubuntu TO libraries, as opposed to IN libraries, and how they have
little funding and little IT help, thus are usually quite conservative
in terms of IT. Thus your best bet, like in schools, is to find a
single champion and focus on the smaller libraries. Now if only I
could find that post.

Cheers,

Corey



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2008 08:27:08 +0100
From: "M. Fioretti" <mfioretti at nexaima.net>
Subject: Re: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID: <20080322072708.GB2766 at nexaima.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Dylan,

I'll start from the end of your mail:

> So, before I meander way off topic: I can't possibly be the only one
> who has pondered promoting Ubuntu, in some way, at a public library.

What about starting from the "Can you still own a book" argument:
http://digifreedom.net/node/101 ? Once you have hooked them that way,
it may be easier to move discussion from Free knowledge and culture to
Free software.

With respect to these other concerns and comments of yours, since the
related suggestions are useful when promoting FOSS in a public library
or any other non-geek context:

> the fact that people are essentially trying to cover up something as
> good and important as open source software, tells me that there is
> something seriously broken here and it has to be fixed one way or
> another.

I am convinced that part of the problem is not generic people covering
up FOSS out of money or ignorance, but FOSS being covered by
communication failures of its very supporters (not necessarily the
Ubuntu part of the community, the behaviors I refer to are much more
frequent in other areas) as I explained here:

http://digifreedom.net/node/56
http://digifreedom.net/node/57

> Obviously, the best way to stop those businesses trying to dodge Linux
> is for people to start coming to their stores thinking about free
> software.

See the slogan in my signature. I also try to give some practical
advice to make this happen at http://digifreedom.net/node/103

which in a nutshell says: start from THEIR beliefs and practical
needs, and stick to those.  The later you start the "you cannot live
without seeing, modifying and sharing the source code of the software
you use!" talk, and if you can avoid it altogether it's even better,
the greater your chances of success.

> ...The obvious /realistic/ fix: Occasional promotion of Ubuntu at
> community events, and with friends

see last link again or, when it comes to parents and schools, this:
http://digifreedom.net/?q=node/74

HTH,
        Marco
-- 
Your own civil rights and the quality of your life heavily depend on how
software is used *around* you:            http://digifreedom.net/node/84



------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2008 21:38:38 +1030
From: "Paul Schulz" <pschulz01 at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [ubuntu-marketing] Promoting Ubuntu at libraries?
To: "Dylan McCall" <dylanmccall at gmail.com>
Cc: ubuntu-marketing at lists.ubuntu.com
Message-ID:
    <cc9bf44d0803220408n40692e56ieae29ad3b8e2363f at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Hi Dylan,

On Sat, Mar 22, 2008 at 2:09 PM, Dylan McCall <dylanmccall at gmail.com> wrote:
(snip)

>  ...The obvious /realistic/ fix: Occasional promotion of Ubuntu at
>  community events, and with friends. ? I for one am personally helping
>  people with their Linux questions in the store I work at, which seems to
>  have developed a quiet increase in Linux-seeking customers...
>  Interestingly, even the people just looking in to Linux for the first
>  time - usually Ubuntu - seem quite excited about the idea, which I find
>  very cool.

For Ubuntu in Australia, the following page hasn't been updated for a
while, but the plan was to encourage those computer shops which where
doing the right thing (by us, and the community).

  https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AustralianTeam/Projects/UbuntuFriendlyComputerShops

>  Then, I realized that I should really think about promoting Ubuntu
>  properly (in an environment where promoting free software does not get
>  frowned upon) if I am so keen on it! One of few other local, popular
>  places keen on free knowledge is a library.

Libraries around here (in South Australia) purchase all their
resources through a central service[1] which is not particularly
interested in Free and Open Source Software, or Creative Commons
material. They seem to be all about 'value for money'.. which is
really odd.

Regardless.. magazines that are published with the lastest Ubuntu CD
are carried[2], and are very useful, but the concept of being able to
make copies to keep or distribute is not actively promoted. Something
about being stuck in a copyright model that doesn't include a license
to copy.

One particular success was with Software Freedom Day[3]. The local
library staff was more than happy to put out a display of  Free and
Open Source Software Books.. although I had to keep my eye on in to
stop the MS Excel manual sneaking in.

I will try and do the same this year, and include Ubuntu CD's as give-a-ways.

(snip)

> ? ??Lots of libraries hold small workshops and classes.

There are computers, and classes, but they have all been installed
with non-free software. The classes that are run
are 'sponsored' by the software vendor at a 'reduced rate' as a
'community service'.

> The one
>  in my area even has an open bulletin board set up, which could prove
>  useful, if there was something worth posting there that didn't look like
>  spam...

All good ideas.

>  So, before I meander way off topic: I can't possibly be the only one who
>  has pondered promoting Ubuntu, in some way, at a public library. Any
>  experiences, examples, related stories, screams of terror or links? Feel
>  free to share!

:-)


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