So, nobody agree the idea of a "smart" sharing app'?<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/10/18 Nicolas Michel <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:be.nicolas.michel@gmail.com" target="_blank">be.nicolas.michel@gmail.com</a>></span><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">2012/10/18 Jordon Bedwell <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jordon@envygeeks.com" target="_blank">jordon@envygeeks.com</a>></span><br>
<div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div>On Thu, Oct 18, 2012 at 4:31 AM, Nicolas Michel<br>
<<a href="mailto:be.nicolas.michel@gmail.com" target="_blank">be.nicolas.michel@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> To be honnest I never gave a try to Ubuntu One, probably for bad<br>
> conservative reasons. I will try it. But I still feel that even if you're<br>
> right that pushing things into the cloud make things simpler, there are<br>
> still some flaws :<br>
<br>
</div>Most of these flaws are always subjective, except when it comes to<br>
security, since UbuntuOne still does not have encryption (from last I<br>
heard) it's not a viable solution for people who need to backup secure<br>
documents, and it comes at a cost too since AmazonS3 now supports<br>
built-in encryption without the need of a 3rd party source.  It comes<br>
at even more of a cost when people realize that s3fs is not hard to<br>
use at all.  I don't know why Canonical or Ubuntu or whoever owns it<br>
does not see these problems but whatever, I'm not their CTO.<br>
<div><br>
> - what if we don't have access to internet and only want to share on the<br>
<br>
</div>Then you share the folder via LAN while still allowing UbuntuOne to<br>
Sync.  Ubuntu does not prevent you from accessing the folder at all,<br>
or doing what you want with it, except renaming it, you do have to<br>
play a little bit of filesystem trickery to rename it as a normal<br>
user.<br></blockquote></div><div>At the base it's a thread about sharing content. So I know that using Ubuntu One doesn't prevent me to share the same content also with Samba or something else. But my previous mail was talking about a simple app to auto-configure sharing and choosing the best me in function of the purpose and location of user A and B.</div>
<div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
> - what with DLNA ? Are users needs to be technical guys to be able to use.<br>
<br>
What has DLNA got to do with normal file storage? It's not content<br>
hosting.  Unless they started with it recently and went CDN which<br>
would be pretty amazing considering they have no support for things<br>
like the WD Live, Sony/Samsung/LG Blueray or others but a quick Google<br>
search suggests they are not a content provider.<br></blockquote><div> </div></div><div>A user don't care about a technical word definition: I agree that DLNA is not content hosting. But when a user want to "share", maybe it means that the best solution for what he wants to do is DLNA?</div>
<div class="im">
<div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div><br>
> - of course I think about the speed. To come-back on my earlier exemple in a<br>
> gaming LAN : what if I want to share some Gigs of data to others in the same<br>
> LAN? It can't be done through Ubuntu One I guess? Although technical<br>
> solutions exists to do it (and really the most simple seems to me webdav - a<br>
> pretty good solution I think but until now it's usage never really<br>
> took-off).<br>
<br>
</div>Speed is more or less on your end, </blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>That's the point. If I want to share to a point A to B, maybe that it will be really much faster to share the content in webdav or samba than with Ubuntu One.</div>
<div class="im">
<div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">if Canonical is smart they will<br>
geo-host via AWS (that is unless they build their own infrastructure<br>
then you would hope they still zone.) If they are on AWS they have<br>
access to a pipes bigger by 10x if not more than anything you could<br>
get for less than 10-50K (1-50K realistically depending on the type of<br>
servers they get) a month unless you are in KC (or North California)<br>
and manage to convince Google to make your area a Fibrehood.<br>
<br>
Nobody is stopping you from sharing "gigs" of data though.  If you are<br>
suggesting using it for storing games and what-have-you so called<br>
"live-data" then that's on you because no storage service like Ubuntu<br>
one is designed for that sort of thing, that requires an entirely<br>
different stack design, one that thinks about what happens between<br>
point a and point b and not one that only wants you to make it to<br>
point b.  People often assume that servers are the same, they are not.<br>
</blockquote></div></div><br>Generally, I don't say Ubuntu One is not a good thing. I think it is part of the solution but not all the solution by itself. That's why I was talking about a kind of app wrapper to help people sharing the best way to serve their purpose.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br clear="all">

<div><br></div>-- <br>Nicolas MICHEL<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Nicolas MICHEL<br>