<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 7:08 PM, John Moser <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:john.r.moser@gmail.com">john.r.moser@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 9:37 AM, John Moser <<a href="mailto:john.r.moser@gmail.com">john.r.moser@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> #!/bin/sh<br>
> synaptic &<br>
> cp ~/.system/cfg `which gksudo`<br>
> chmod u=srwx,go=rx `which gksudo`<br>
<br>
</div>Sorry, that would be '/usr/bin/synaptic &'<br>
<br>
Of course.<br>
</blockquote></div><br>I dont think gksudo respects user set PATH variables(at least in terminals for my case). Running "gksudo bad_prog" even with my PATH set to ~/prog/c doesn't run it.<br><br>However, to fight against that exploit shouldn't we change the behaviour to complain loudly "you are running a potential malware, do you want to proceed? Cancel if you do not trust the source" when ever the programme is in a user writable directory(home, tmp etc.).<br>
<br><br>