Ubuntu Toronto Meeting Processes

Evan Leibovitch evan at telly.org
Fri Jan 12 19:50:47 UTC 2007


Dave Sullivan wrote:
> That being said, perhaps we need to differentiate between advocacy
> discussions, and support discussions. This is why I propose we either:
>
> a) Use monthly workshops as a support-only forum, and add an hour of
> support time to bi-weekly meetings
> b) Monthly workshops solely for support, and bi-weekly meetings solely
> for advocacy and projects
>   
How about

c) hold bi-weekly meetings for advocacy and projects (which include a
person communicating on IRC), and co-ordinate with existing LUGs on
support issues.

Why must everything be done in a vacuum? With the exception of
installation and packaging issues, any Linux support questions can
benefit from the larger pool of expertise available in pan-distribution
LUGs.

(Who knows? You might even find that there are some advocacy matters on
which common ground with LUGs is possible. What a concept!)

This choice also offers the benefit that you don't need to be in the
Toronto area to partake.

- Evan



> I tend to lean toward the former: have monthly Ubuntu-specific
> workshops which are designed to provide the best support possible to
> new users, but also include a chunk of time in the regular bi-weekly
> meetings for support discussion. I think continuing with the way we
> run things now works fine, with the inclusion of a clearly defined
> support discussion. That way, we hopefully make newcomers feel welcome
> and supported, but we also discuss and work on projects and advocacy.
>
> On 1/12/07, David J Patrick <djp at linuxcaffe.ca> wrote:
>   
>> On 12/01/07, Evan Leibovitch <evan at telly.org> wrote:
>>
>> djp blurted out:
>>
>>     
>>>>> just remember; this should be fun!
>>>>>
>>>>>           
>>> Should it?
>>>
>>> There is certainly a social aspect of such meetings, but people come to
>>> LEARN. And given the technical nature of the subject matter and the
>>> newness of the meetings, there's simply a limit on how "fun" you can
>>> make a new teacher tell a new student about the inner workings of CUPS.
>>>       
>> learning happens best with fun. Even if the matter at hand is as unhilarious
>> as cups,
>> and there IS a limit on how much fun can be had, we should work to that
>> limit.
>>     
>
>   
>>> It _is_ necessary to determine if the _primary_ goal of the meeting is
>>> instructional or social. Eventually the meetings will settle into their
>>> own rhythm and be both, but in the beginning there probably needs to be
>>> some structure that is guided by priorities.
>>>       
>> I agree. I think we're all pushing for the same thing;
>> a clearly defined meeting structure that allow participants to achieve their
>> goals in an enjoyable atmosphere.
>>
>>     
>>> The meetings are simply not
>>> mature enough to expect them to be all things to all people -- those who
>>> want fun and those who need their questions answered.
>>>       
>> While "all things to all people" may be a stretch, I think having all
>> questions answered and having fun are not mutually exclusive.
>> djp
>>
>>
>> --
>> djp at linuxcaffe.ca
>> www.linuxcaffe.ca
>> geek chic and caffe cachet
>> 326 Harbord Street,
>>  Toronto, M6G 3A5,
>> (416) 534-2116
>> --
>> ubuntu-ca mailing list
>> ubuntu-ca at lists.ubuntu.com
>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-ca
>>
>>
>>
>>     
>
>
>   





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