[Ubuntu Wiki] Update of "Bugs/Importance" by es20490446e

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Sat Jul 25 14:58:01 UTC 2015


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The "Bugs/Importance" page has been changed by es20490446e:
http://wiki.ubuntu.com/Bugs/Importance?action=diff&rev1=6&rev2=7

- #REFRESH 0 https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Bugs/Bug%20importances
+ <<Include(BugSquad/KBHeader)>>
  
+ Ubuntu uses the following guidelines for assigning importance.  The importance of the bug signifies the priority that it should be given by people fixing bugs.  
+ 
+ In order to set the Importance field of a bug in [[Launchpad]], you need to be a member of [[UbuntuBugControl]] either through direct membership or because of your membership in another team. The importance of the bug should be set as soon as possible.
+ 
+ The importance of a bug report can be modified by clicking on the current Status or Importance, in the yellow line and under the "Affects" column header, which will reveal a sub menu.  You can then choose a new importance in the drop down box.
+ 
+ Here are the meanings of the different importance values:
+ 
+  * '''Undecided''': The default for new bugs.  Also means that there is insufficient information to determine importance.
+ 
+  * '''Wishlist''': Missing functionality.
+   * These aren't always bugs, but can be ideas for new features which do not yet exist.
+   * These can also be requests to have software packaged for Ubuntu.
+   * If it is non-trivial to implement, it should rather be written as a feature specification, see FeatureSpecifications.
+   * These can be bugs that affect an experimental extension or non-essential feature of a given package/project.
+   * Bugs that would only be fixed on a best-effort or outside-contribution basis might also be considered ''wishlist''.
+ 
+  * '''Low''': Bugs which affect functionality, but to a lesser extent than most bugs, examples are:
+   * Bugs that have easy [[http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/work-around|work-arounds]]
+   * Bugs that affect unusual end-user configurations or uncommon hardware
+   * Bugs that affect a non-essential aspect and limited scope of the application
+   * Bugs that have a moderate impact on a non-core application
+   * Cosmetic/usability issues that does not limit the functionality of a non-core application
+   * Non-ideal default configurations
+ 
+  * '''Medium''':  Most bugs are of medium importance, examples are:
+   * A bug that has a moderate impact on a core application.
+   * A bug that has a severe impact on a non-core application.
+   * A bug which impacts accessibility of a non-core application.
+   * A usability issue that does not limit the functionality of a core application.
+   * A problem with a non-essential hardware component (removable network card, camera, webcam, music player, sound card, power management feature, printer, etc.)
+  * '''High''': A bug which fulfills one of the following criteria:
+   * Has a severe impact on a small portion of Ubuntu users (estimated)
+   * Makes a default Ubuntu installation generally unusable for some users
+    * For example, if the system fails to boot, or X fails to start, on a certain make and model of computer
+   * A problem with an essential hardware component (disk controller, built-in networking, video card, keyboard, mouse)
+   * Has a moderate impact on a large portion of Ubuntu users (estimated)
+   * Prevents the application or any dependencies from functioning correctly at all
+   * Renders essential features or functionality of the application or dependencies broken or ineffective
+   * Impacts accessibility of a core application
+  * '''Critical''': A bug which has a severe impact on a large portion of Ubuntu users
+   * Causes data corruption
+   * Crashes the entire operating system
+   * Renders the system temporarily or permanently unusable
+   * Severely affects applications beyond the package responsible for the root cause
+ 
+ ||<tablestyle="width:90%;" style="width: 35px; border: none; -moz-border-radius-topleft: 15px ;-moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 15px; background-color: #F1F1DD; border: none; -moz-border-radius-topright: 15px;-moz-border-radius-bottomright: 15px; font-size: 1em; text-align: center;">{{attachment:IconHelp2.png}}If you're not yet an [[https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuBugControl|Ubuntu Bug Control]] member, you'll have to ask someone who is to do it for you. Paste the bug number in {{{#ubuntu-bugs}}} channel at [[https://wiki.ubuntu.com/FreeNode|FreeNode]] and say you think the bug should be set to importance 'Wishlist / Low / Medium / High / Critical'. Someone will notice your comment and set it for you, although not necessarily immediately.||
+ ----
+ ||<tablestyle="width:90%;" style="width: 35px; border: none; -moz-border-radius-topleft: 15px ;-moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 15px; background-color: #F1F1DD; border: none; -moz-border-radius-topright: 15px;-moz-border-radius-bottomright: 15px; font-size: 0.8em; text-align: center;"> '''Footnote:''' ||
+ ||[[http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/work-around|work-around]]:||a plan or method to circumvent a problem ''without'' eliminating it ||
+ ||"core":||A core package can be identified as being part of a task in the apt-cache headers.  You can see the apt-cache headers by running `apt-cache show [package]` in a terminal, and looking at the "Task: " field in the output.||
+ ||"non-core":||A non-core package can be identified as a package that is not part of a task, and is not in 'main'.  You can see the apt-cache headers by running `apt-cache show [package]` in a terminal, and looking at the "Task: " field in the output.||
+ ----
+ CategoryBugSquad
+ 



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