<div dir="ltr"><div><div>Aere:<br><br></div>Interesting question, up to your usual standards . . . short answer, I certainly don't know.  My last fresh install is Lu Next 18.04 and I did "manual" and the installer "found" my two swap partitions in two different drives and in Gparted it shows the swap partition with "keys" next to them . . . so, did it put some file in the partition, or since the partition was there it just used it??  Don't know?  Walter would probably know the answer to that one . . . among others who work the technical ends of the distros.<br><br></div>F<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 10:28 AM, Aere Greenway <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:Aere@dvorak-keyboards.com" target="_blank">Aere@dvorak-keyboards.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class="">On 05/15/2018 10:36 AM, Fritz Hudnut wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Hmmm, well I don't know if that fits the same "multi-boot" scenario that I'm referring to, where the last installed system will take over the swap partition, leaving the other distros without a linked swap UUID . . . and seeming to take a lot longer to boot.  In this case the last upgraded system should have "captured" the shared swap and should therefore boot "normally"??<br>
</blockquote>
<br></span>
It seems I read somewhere, that at least with Ubuntu 18.04, they were abandoning the use of swap partitions, and instead using swap files.  Does this apply to all Ubuntu variants, or is it only for Ubuntu?<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
<br>
-- <br>
Sincerely,<br>
Aere<br>
<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>