<div dir="ltr">Hi Ralf et al,<br><div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 12 November 2017 at 14:45, Ralf Mardorf <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ralf.mardorf@alice-dsl.net" target="_blank">ralf.mardorf@alice-dsl.net</a>></span> wrote: <br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Apart from this, it might have been a BIOS issue and maybe the RAM<br>
wasn't bad. Memtest is _not_ reliable. Using Memtest makes sense, but<br>
you shouldn't trust it.<br>
<br>
If RAM shouldn't pass Memtest you need to rule out other issues, at<br>
least you should replug the RAM bars.<br></blockquote></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Given personal experience of refurbishing computers for the Contact Computer Wombling/Refurbishing Project, I have found that when a computer I'm working on fails to run memtest86+ , that computer is not reliable enough for normal use. After a memtest86+ test has been passed, I wipe the hard drive using dban. If that fails, it is a strong indication that I'm going to have to change the hard drive.<br></div><br clear="all"></div><div class="gmail_extra">HTH,</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Ian</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">-- <br><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div>-- ACCU - Professionalism in programming - <a href="http://www.accu.org" target="_blank">http://www.accu.org</a><br></div>-- My writing - <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/ianbruntlett/" target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/ianbruntlett/</a><br><div>-- Free Software page - <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/ianbruntlett/home/free-software" target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/ianbruntlett/home/free-software</a><br></div><br> </div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div></div>