<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Hi,<br>
      I agree with Nio, in theory (or at least from what I can
      understand about it) I also think a casper read-write partition
      would work.  You might look at the usb-creator source code:<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~usb-creator-hackers/usb-creator/trunk/files">http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~usb-creator-hackers/usb-creator/trunk/files</a><br>
      it is written in Python, so it may take some time to understand
      the process.  You might even be able to take some code form it and
      make something along the lines of a One Pendrive for all x86 based
      computers (well... realistically only 586+ as cmov is not
      supported in any modern Ubuntu kernels and neither is non-PAE)<br>
      <br>
      <br>
      On 06/24/2015 11:34 AM, Andre Campos Rodovalho wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CABLbVHMTLj6Tfs6Av2CBmEsKM+BB0LPn39DiaKMkjpf3O-62Kw@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">> I'm
          thinking about the casper-rw partition. Could it be used for
          the iso</span><br style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">
        <span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">> </span><span
          style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">files in a convenient
          way? Maybe - and it is better to have few</span><br
          style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">
        <span style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">> </span><span
          style="font-size:12.8000001907349px">partitions, when the
          drive is small.</span><br>
        <div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all">
          <div>
            <div class="gmail_signature">
              <div dir="ltr">
                <div dir="ltr">
                  <div dir="ltr">
                    <div dir="ltr">
                      <div dir="ltr">
                        <div dir="ltr">
                          <div>
                            <div>Unfortunately I don't know much about
                              casper-rw. I think using it with an
                              regular ISO might not be easy. I have no
                              idea how these partitions are mounted...
                              Maybe is a custom configuration made by
                              startup disk creator!?</div>
                          </div>
                          <div><br>
                          </div>
                          <div>I made a usb bootable device with startup
                            disk creator and persistence a long time
                            ago. I noticed the content of iso was
                            extracted to the drive, and the persistence
                            was made with a file...</div>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </div>
                </div>
              </div>
            </div>
          </div>
          <br>
          <div class="gmail_quote">2015-06-24 12:28 GMT-03:00 Nio
            Wiklund <span dir="ltr"><<a moz-do-not-send="true"
                href="mailto:nio.wiklund@gmail.com" target="_blank">nio.wiklund@gmail.com</a>></span>:<br>
            <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px
0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi
              Andre,<br>
              <br>
              Nice to see you here again. I notice that your tutorial
              thread at the<br>
              Ubuntu Forums is attracting many readers :-)<br>
              <br>
              Yes I know there are advantages with ext partitions and
              how to tweak<br>
              them for optimal performance and lifetime on a pendrive,
              but I didn't<br>
              want to make the setup too complicated. You may be right,
              that there are<br>
              enough advantages with ext filesystems, so that I should
              store the<br>
              isofiles there (and have only a small fat32 partition to
              allow for UEFI<br>
              booting).<br>
              <br>
              Anyway, pendrives are often slow, and I have found that
              rsync behaves<br>
              much better than zsync, when the target drive for updating
              is a<br>
              pendrive. I think this is true also with ext filesystems.<br>
              <br>
              One big advantage is that there is no need for
              copying/cloning/flashing<br>
              from the internal drive to the pendrive. The slowness of
              the internet<br>
              connection matches quite well the slowness of a USB 2
              connection, so you<br>
              don't lose much time anyway.<br>
              <br>
              Fragmentation is another reason to avoid fat 32. I guess I
              have to watch<br>
              out for that, but as long as the iso files remain about
              the same size<br>
              and the file system is far from full, that should be a
              small problem in<br>
              this case.<br>
              <br>
              I'm thinking about the casper-rw partition. Could it be
              used for the iso<br>
              files in a convenient way? Maybe - and it is better to
              have few<br>
              partitions, when the drive is small.<br>
              <br>
              Best regards<br>
              Nio<br>
              <span class=""><br>
                <br>
                Den 2015-06-24 14:35, Andre Campos Rodovalho skrev:<br>
                > Hey Nio, you can use ext4 partition and grub2 for a
                BIOS boot. (This<br>
                > might allow you to zsync, for testing..)<br>
                ><br>
                > Another option might be to create a first "boot"
                partition with<br>
                > GPT+FAT32, but set up GRUB2 to load images in a
                second ext4 partition,<br>
                > (where the ISO files will be stored).<br>
                ><br>
                > I know this should work, but I had no time to test
                it out yet...<br>
                ><br>
                > Cheers!<br>
                ><br>
                ><br>
                > 2015-06-19 15:43 GMT-03:00 Nio Wiklund <<a
                  moz-do-not-send="true"
                  href="mailto:nio.wiklund@gmail.com">nio.wiklund@gmail.com</a><br>
              </span>> <mailto:<a moz-do-not-send="true"
                href="mailto:nio.wiklund@gmail.com">nio.wiklund@gmail.com</a>>>:<br>
              <span class="">><br>
                >     Hi again :-)<br>
                ><br>
                >     There is one minor edit:<br>
                ><br>
                >     I wrote 'You can even zsync the Lubuntu daily
                iso file directly into the<br>
                >     pendrive for iso-testing.' That was to promise
                too much. I tried, and<br>
                >     found that zsync is slow with a slow drive and
                uses some features of an<br>
                >     ext file system while we are using fat32. It is
                better to use *rsync*<br>
                >     (which is also an alternative in the
                instructions for iso-testing. I<br>
                >     made this script for 'wily-desktop-i386.iso',<br>
                ><br>
                >   
                 --------------------------------------------------------------<br>
                >     echo "***** get/update iso file with  rsync:"<br>
                >     rsync -tzhhP<br>
                >     rsync://<a moz-do-not-send="true"
href="http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/cdimage/lubuntu/daily-live/current/wily-desktop-i386.iso"
                  rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">cdimage.ubuntu.com/cdimage/lubuntu/daily-live/current/wily-desktop-i386.iso</a><br>
              </span>>     <<a moz-do-not-send="true"
href="http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/cdimage/lubuntu/daily-live/current/wily-desktop-i386.iso"
                rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/cdimage/lubuntu/daily-live/current/wily-desktop-i386.iso</a>><br>
              <div class="">
                <div class="h5">>     .<br>
                  ><br>
                  >     echo "<br>
                  >     ***** check md5sum:"<br>
                  >     wget -O md5sums<br>
                  >     <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                    href="http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/daily-live/current/MD5SUMS"
                    rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/daily-live/current/MD5SUMS</a><br>
                  >     grep wily-desktop-i386.iso
                  md5sums>md5sum-desktop<br>
                  >     md5sum -c md5sum-desktop<br>
                  >   
                   --------------------------------------------------------------<br>
                  ><br>
                  >     You need space for two versions of the iso
                  file (plus a little extra<br>
                  >     margin). The old one is not wiped until the
                  new one is complete.<br>
                  ><br>
                  >     Best regards<br>
                  >     Nio<br>
                  ><br>
                  <br>
                </div>
              </div>
            </blockquote>
          </div>
          <br>
        </div>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Regards</pre>
  </body>
</html>