<!DOCTYPE html><html><head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  
<style type="text/css">body { font-family:'DejaVu Sans Mono'; font-size:12px}</style>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000"><div><br></div><div>In the Very Good, Very Old days when I used to personally build, sell, install and maintain my own line of desktop PCs (a mere sideline to my core business of writing and selling my own cost-control software for the construction industry) there was a very mean company called-but-not-named M$ that forced a horrible 16-bit operating system named MS-DOS onto almost all PC manufacturers in a way that was surely illegal, certainly immoral. It did not match any of my standards - ethical, functional, quality or economic - and I was delighted to discover an alternative named DR-DOS, from the Digital Research company that had provided the CP/M that controlled so many 8-bit micros. It met all of my standards, and after that I never sold a PC with MS-DOS preloaded. Just one example of its superiority: a command called xcopy (eXtended COPY), which did everything the M$ dupes wished "copy" could do but were forced to turn to Norton Utilities or similar to perform. It took many years before M$'s miserable "copy" came anywhere near.</div><div><br></div><div>To do a backup with xcopy was simplicity itself because of the command-line parameters that were available, documented clearly and on-line in less than 1 Hercules 25-line screen. For 10 years or more that was all I needed for shifting HDUs-full of files and directories around with a single command.</div><div><br></div><div>Xcopy failed to be updated for a 32-bit, let alone 64-bit, world and became less and less useful because of its addressing inadequacies. I moved to OS/2, and found command-line and graphical utilities that worked quite intuitively and effectively. OS/2 was great, although poisoned in the marketplace by the Evil Empire. Eventually I could resist the Win32 pressure no longer, and transferred to Window 2000 Server, a fine but flawed piece of work. Graduated eventually to Win7, all the while keeping an eye on Linux to see if it was desktop-ready yet. With inexpensive 3G modems joining sort-of-usable printing via CUPS, I moved slowly into OpenSuSE, then 'buntus, and am now pretty well settled with Lubuntu and other Debian derivatives. (And I dabble with a wide variety of other distros. Distrowatch is a dangerous site!)</div><div><br></div><div>And I have not found a single simple way to do the simple thing that was the mainstay of my file management, for myself and my hundreds of clients, for more than 2 decades. Oh, I know that in 'nix a file is a much more complex thing than we DOSsers every imagined. Oh yes, I speed-read  coreutils.info  last night, looking for useful hints, all 18627 lines, of which almost 3000 lines are of <em>index</em> for, pardon me, important <em>concepts</em> which presumably you should be familiar with before you can select out the half-dozen you actually want to use. A 3000-concept learning-curve before you can decide whether and how to use   cp  (after reading at a guess 7 times as many screens for man cp as for the very-effective help-option for xcopy), cpio  or  backup? OK, I guess, if you want to become sysadmin for a university. But guess what: our DR-DOS tools managed to hide the potential complexity from us hillbillies very successfully 99.9999% of the time. Why should we expect anything inferior from Linux, and to be even more direct, Ubuntu setting its sights on the common users of a wide range of platforms? Yet more so, Lubuntu which is spreading the domain of Ubuntu even wider?</div><div><div><br></div></div><div>At least I learned that what I thought I wanted to do and I gather you want to do, i.e. to make backups, is not what Linux thinks I want to do. Nor is a Linux archive what I want to make, although it could be twisted to get halfway there. And  cp  may non-obviously be pressed into the next-door county, but getting it across the border into mine will probably require writing a shell-script. </div><div><br></div><div>I thought about that for maybe 30 seconds (haven't tried bash or Python, my language of choice is C followed by C++) while I opened up a terminal and typed "man fc" and nothing was found. Meaning, I think, that there's an acronym open for implementation of a user-developed command (File Compare - yes, I know you can get  cp  to do this) which will be parametrisable to follow up the comparison (after user intervention, if needed, in dubious cases) with whatever backup/archiving process has been pre-planned. May as well put the research done to good use. Maybe it could even become feasible to pipe stuff through an interface to your favorite cloud?</div><div><br></div><div>Last remark: why don't Linux packagers like acronyms for naming utilities? (Copy Phile???!!! Goes off muttering to himself...)</div><div><br></div><div>All the best for your search, but remember Linux has a different take on backups.</div><div><br></div><div>Basil Fernie</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>On Fri, 05 Dec 2014 00:03:37 +0200, John Hupp <lubuntu@prpcompany.com> wrote:<br></div><br><blockquote style="margin: 0 0 0.80ex; border-left: #0000FF 2px solid; padding-left: 1ex">
    I'm still working on a solution for the problems I raised in the
    thread "A survey of GUI-based free online backup."<br>
    <br>
    I have swung this way and that looking for the best approach.  Time
    and again, I have found something that is promising in one regard
    but undesirable in another.<br>
    <br>
    Here is where I am right now.  <br>
    </blockquote><div>:</div><div>:</div><div>:</div><blockquote style="margin: 0 0 0.80ex; border-left: #0000FF 2px solid; padding-left: 1ex">Using Opera's mail client: <a href="http://www.opera.com/mail/">http://www.opera.com/mail/</a></blockquote></body></html>