<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 01/04/2014 05:12 AM, Ali Linx
      (amjjawad) wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAAohP4tEq0zZweUfsVesz3C5vYKsJmimwOajDSkqp=vovY1pbA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div>
          <div>Hi,<br>
            <br>
            <a moz-do-not-send="true"
              href="http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2197530">http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2197530</a><br>
            <br>
          </div>
          What do you think? :)<br>
          <br>
        </div>
        Thank you!<br clear="all">
        <div>
          <div>
            <div><br>
              -- <br>
              <div dir="ltr">
                <div>
                  <div>
                    <div><span style="color:rgb(204,0,0)">Remember: "All
                        of us are smarter than any one of us."</span><br>
                      Best Regards,<br>
                    </div>
                    <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                      href="https://wiki.ubuntu.com/amjjawad"
                      target="_blank">amjjawad</a><br>
                  </div>
                  <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                    href="https://wiki.ubuntu.com/amjjawad/AreasOfInvolvement"
                    target="_blank">Areas of Involvement</a><br>
                </div>
                <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                  href="https://wiki.ubuntu.com/amjjawad/Projects"
                  target="_blank">My Projects</a><br>
              </div>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    Ali, and All (hmm... the two names look very similar:<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Not having technical insight into the area, all I can respond to
    this with, is my experience.  <br>
    <br>
    <b>Experience-area #1:</b><br>
    <br>
    All of my childrens' families (four of them) use Linux (mostly
    Lubuntu, but one Ubuntu, and one Kubuntu).  <br>
    <br>
    Though I encourage them to be careful, they (especially their kids)
    are not as careful as I am.  They have been using Linux since Ubuntu
    8.04.  <br>
    <br>
    Since I am their 'computer help-desk', I would know about any
    computer virus or malware happening in those systems.  I also
    upgrade their systems, and check-out their old systems as part of
    that process.  <br>
    <br>
    To date, none of their Linux systems have become 'infected' with
    either a virus or malware.  There are multiple cases, however, where
    their Windows partitions have become infected.  That infection did
    not spread (as far as I can tell) to their Linux partitions.  <br>
    <br>
    <b>Experience-area #2:</b><br>
    <br>
    All the time I have been using Linux (since 7.04), I have also had
    Windows partitions.  I have a rule with using those Windows
    partitions, namely, if I browse the Internet or read e-mail with
    those partitions, I must have an updated anti-virus active.  <br>
    <br>
    Even if I don't read e-mail or browse the Internet on such
    partitions, I always keep applying updates.  <br>
    <br>
    When I abandoned using Windows in favor of using Linux, I no longer
    renewed my anti-virus subscriptions, and in some cases (where they
    became too 'virulent' in demanding I renew the subscription), I
    removed the anti-virus software altogether.  <br>
    <br>
    I currently do a lot of testing with all of my systems (including
    the Windows partitions, and also two Mac OS X partitions).  <br>
    <br>
    But on these test systems, if things went bad (got infected) I could
    easily wipe the infected partition clean, and re-install (and
    update) the system new.  I do not have anti-virus software on these
    systems for that reason, and (per my rule), I don't browse the
    Internet using them (other than a few trusted sites), and I don't
    read e-mail on them.  <br>
    <br>
    I have never yet gotten a Windows virus an any of my Windows
    partitions (abiding by the above rules).  <br>
    <br>
    I have never yet gotten any Linux virus (or malware) since I started
    using Linux with Ubuntu 7.04 (and a SUSE Linux system just prior to
    that time).  I do browse the Internet and read e-mail on those
    systems.  All of those systems have the 'wine' package installed.  <br>
    <br>
    As a side-note, I have never yet encountered a virus on my two Mac
    OS X systems (used since 2012).  I do not browse the Internet (other
    than a few trusted sites), or read e-mail on those machines.  <br>
    <br>
    Admittedly, I am pretty suspicious and careful, and don't click on
    things other people would click-on without thinking.  I refuse to
    sign the agreement to use FaceBook (and others), and (for the same
    reason) don't have a gmail account.  <br>
    <br>
    Anyway, that is my experience.  <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    My plans for my two remaining Windows XP partitions, after Microsoft
    stops supporting XP, is to keep using them for testing (not browsing
    the Internet, or reading e-mail).  I still need to test on XP at
    present, and probably into the future.  <br>
    <br>
    I worry that if I ever had to re-install one of my Windows XP
    systems (after April 2014) if I would be able to 'activate' the
    re-installed system.  If activation is no longer possible, that
    machine would become a Linux-only machine (since I already have
    Windows Vista, 7, & 8 systems to test with).  <br>
    <br>
    I think if people have un-supported Windows XP systems (after this
    coming April), they can continue to use them, as long as they don't
    browse the Internet or read e-mail with them.  <br>
    <br>
    I suspect that the anti-virus companies will continue to supply
    anti-virus subscriptions for them, but they would still have some
    risk of some operating-system exploit (where there are no more OS
    updates).  <br>
    <br>
    People with such systems could install and dual-boot Linux on those
    machines, using Linux for browsing the Internet and reading e-mail. 
    They could preserve their Windows partitions for running any
    software they have no equivalent for on Linux.  <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Anyway, that is my experience, and my future plans.  If any of you
    have information that might show my future plans to be risky, please
    enlighten me (and others) of it.  <br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Sincerely,
Aere</pre>
  </body>
</html>