<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 TRANSITIONAL//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
  <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; CHARSET=UTF-8">
  <META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="GtkHTML/4.6.0">
</HEAD>
<BODY>
All:<BR>
<BR>
I have been (successfully?) using Ubuntu One on Lubuntu 12.04, and 12.10.  The question-mark after "successfully" is because I have never had the need to download from it to my machine.  I am using it for offsite backup purposes.  <BR>
<BR>
I didn't have to install anything, but I did install the "cryptkeeper" package, so that I could create an encrypted folder within the "Ubuntu One" folder, that is automatically synchronized between the 'cloud' and your machine.  You simply copy the files you want to back-up into the encrypted folder, which encrypts the files you copy.  <BR>
<BR>
You do have to create an Ubuntu One account, but it's free if you use no more than 5 gigabytes.  It would be easy to exceed the 5 gigabyte limit if you don't watch it, and take action to avoid using more space than you intended, so be careful.  <BR>
<BR>
After firing-up cryptkeeper, I just copy the files I want to save into that encrypted folder within the "Ubuntu One", and the system automatically starts copying any new files to the web.  <BR>
<BR>
Beware that upload Internet speeds are probably much less than download speeds.  When I had 1.5 megabit Internet speed, the process of uploading would totally use-up my Internet usage, and I couldn't use it for anything else while uploading, which also took a long time.  <BR>
<BR>
So maybe with that speed, it really isn't practical.  But with my current 7-megabit Internet speed, it seems to work well (and I can do other stuff on the Internet while uploading).  The upload speed seems to be about what my download speed was back when I had 1.5 megabit speed, but it's adequate for uploads of maybe 20 megabytes at a time.  It doesn't seem to bog-down my machine too much while it's running.  <BR>
<BR>
One advantage of using Deja Dup, is that it automatically encrypts, and also compresses, so doing backups to your Ubuntu One folder is reasonable, as long as you don't have so much to backup.  The downside is that it will eventually automatically exceed your 5 gigabyte limit (making it cost you money), without taking uncertain manual steps to limit the space in your "Ubuntu One" folder.  <BR>
<BR>
Ubuntu One seems to be implemented in Python (which is installed automatically on all 'flavors' of Ubuntu).  <BR>
<BR>
It does work on Lubuntu (as well as Ubuntu, and Ubuntu-Studio (XFCE)).  I don't know if it works on Kubuntu (KDE).  <BR>
<BR>
I apologize for the long-winded response, but I hope my experience using it is useful.  <BR>
-- 
<PRE>
Sincerely,
Aere
</PRE>
<BR>
-----Original Message-----<BR>
<B>From</B>: John Hupp <<A HREF="mailto:John%20Hupp%20%3clubuntu@prpcompany.com%3e">lubuntu@prpcompany.com</A>><BR>
<B>To</B>: <A HREF="mailto:lubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com">lubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com</A><BR>
<B>Subject</B>: [Lubuntu] Ubuntu One how-to for online backup/sync?<BR>
<B>Date</B>: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 12:38:37 -0500<BR>
<BR>
<PRE>
I wrote earlier about online backup, but now I'm wondering in particular 
about Ubuntu One, which is explicitly designed as a sync service rather 
than a backup service.  But that should serve well enough for many 
backup needs.

Has anyone set this up afresh on Precise or Quantal?  What packages do I 
need to install for full GUI usage?  Are there any work-arounds needed 
to get it behaving well?

Questions I'm not asking: 1) I read that Ubuntu One stores are not 
encrypted, but for my current purpose I don't need it. 2) I already 
created an account and don't need to know about that.

(I ask these questions because Ubuntu One is aimed at Ubuntu and 
Nautilus, and I read here, there and elsewhere about problems setting it 
up and getting the various pieces to work right with LXDE and Pcmanfm. 
But I have not seen a recipe or how-to anywhere for Lubuntu.)

</PRE>
</BODY>
</HTML>