<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/strict.dtd"><html><head><meta name="qrichtext" content="1" /><style type="text/css">p, li { white-space: pre-wrap; }</style></head><body style=" font-family:'DejaVu Sans'; font-size:9pt; font-weight:400; font-style:normal;">On Monday 15 June 2009 06:33:27 am Eberhard Roloff wrote:<br>
> David McGlone wrote:<br>
> > On Monday 15 June 2009 04:08:10 am Steven Vollom wrote:<br>
> >>> But I agree with everyone else.  Your problem is one of configuration.<br>
> >>> Probably you have several different things misconfigured, including, by<br>
> >>> the sound of it, your router.<br>
> >><br>
> >> It may be the router, but I have been using the router like a hub, not<br>
> >> for the purpose intended.  I don't have any of the former passwords, and<br>
> >> can't remember how it was set up when it worked wirelessly.  But when I<br>
> >> just used it like a hub and used cable to connect both my laptop and the<br>
> >> desktop, it gave me internet and email, and that is what I used it for. <br>
> >> Nothing else.<br>
> ><br>
> > I don't know if I should mention this or not but here goes<br>
> ><br>
> > Steven, Keep this in mind for the future, please don't try it yet, it may<br>
> > only add to your problems. There is a small button on your router either<br>
> > on the back of it or the front, maybe even the bottom, that you can only<br>
> > push it with a sharp pencil or a pin. If you hold this button in for<br>
> > about 5 - 10 seconds it will reset your router to the manufacturers<br>
> > default settings.<br>
> ><br>
> >> Just so you know this as of this minute, if I connect the broken<br>
> >> computer to the Modem it still doesn't work.  If I do the same with the<br>
> >> laptop it works. Don't know if that is useful, but it is the case.<br>
><br>
> ATTENTION:<br>
> While this is surely correct for resetting the router to<br>
> factory default, this could do much more harm than help in<br>
> this very special case.<br>
><br>
> Reason:<br>
> Any router that I know of (but I surely do not nearly know<br>
> any router out there!) by factory default acts as a dhcp server.<br>
><br>
> Now, if you use the router just as a hub and "that other<br>
> device on the network" already acts as a dhcp server, then<br>
> you suddenly will have two dhcp servers activated on your<br>
> small home network with unforeseen consequences.<br>
><br>
> So Steven, you surely can reset the router in order to reset<br>
> the passwords, but only do so when you are fully aware about<br>
> the possible consequences and if in doubt, you are wellcome<br>
> to ask here.<br>
><br>
> Kind regards<br>
> Eberhard<br>
<p style="-qt-paragraph-type:empty; margin-top:0px; margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:0px; margin-right:0px; -qt-block-indent:0; text-indent:0px; -qt-user-state:0;"><br></p>You may have found the source of the problem.  I don't have a memory with any detail, but I do remember about a year ago when someone suggested resetting defaults.  I think I did, so the laptop and router may be in that state.  But remember all the problems started before the laptop.  It was a last minute addition.  It is very possible, even probable that the router was at defaults when I first connected it to the old computer and the laptop.  They worked great when the laptop did not have the switching problems.  Both had access to the Internet and email.  Still it worked fine as a hub for several months, and nothing was changed even when I added the laptop this time.  I expected if the laptop would just turn on, it would work on the router.  This is the most confusing problem I have ever had.  Thanks for your continued help, friend.<br>
<p style="-qt-paragraph-type:empty; margin-top:0px; margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:0px; margin-right:0px; -qt-block-indent:0; text-indent:0px; -qt-user-state:0;"><br></p>Steven</p></body></html>