Permissions problems are being a huge PIMA

Tom H tomh0665 at gmail.com
Tue Feb 1 00:58:51 UTC 2011


On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 6:21 PM, gene heskett <gheskett at wdtv.com> wrote:
> On Monday, January 31, 2011 05:54:33 pm Tom H did opine:
>> On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 2:19 PM, gene heskett <gheskett at wdtv.com> wrote:
>> > On Monday, January 31, 2011 02:18:25 pm Tom H did opine:
>> >> On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 10:46 AM, gene heskett <gheskett at wdtv.com>
> wrote:
>> >> > I do the 99.999999999% of my email activities from a nice comfy
>> >> > chair, in a nice comfy heated house.
>> >> >
>> >> > The machine in the shop runs 24/7 though, so it is 'mounted' as a
>> >> > cifs share, and this is where the PIMA starts.
>> >> >
>> >> > Because the *buntu's start their user number schemes at 1000,
>> >> > whereas the rest of the known universe starts at 500, even though
>> >> > I am the user gene on both boxes, I have no write perms via cifs
>> >> > in the /home/gene tree on the milling machines kubuntu install.
>> >> >
>> >> > So that I can save a useful bit of rs-274 nc code directly from an
>> >> > email received on this machine, directly to the
>> >> > /home/gene/emc/nc_files directory on that *buntu box in the shop,
>> >> > what then is the std procedure to establish that the user gene=500
>> >> > on this box, is the user gene=1000 on that box?
>> >>
>> >> The "UID_MIN 1000" setting is a Debianism that you can modify in
>> >> "/etc/login.defs".
>> >
>> > As that is set at install time, from read-only media, that doesn't
>> > sound practical to do now.
>>
>> You can boot into single user mode and do either of the following:
>>
>> 1. Delete the user created at install, modify "/etc/login.defs", and
>> re-create the user. (Only useful at first boot!)
>>
> That was 6 months and a lot of carved steel before. :)
>
>> 2. Modify the uid of the user,  modify "/etc/login.defs", and chown
>> the user's home directory recursively with the new uid.
>
> In this order?  I am currently ssh -Y'd into that box and I'd hate doing
> half of it and being locked out.  So, I first modified /etc/adduser.conf,
> then /etc/group, finally /etc/passwd (all as sudo -i), then cd'd to /home
> and did the chown -R gene:gene gene bit.  A couple of ls -l's seem to
> indicate it all worked.  Backed out of the sudo with a ctrl-d. But emc
> wouldn't run, something about a BadWindow error. Sudo reboot, & close the
> link.  Waited for a ping to work then it took 3 passes before it bought my
> password again, but I'm back in with an "ssh -Y shop" as gene on this box.
>
> But, emc still has a tummy ache over X and exits.  Humm, that box was
> sitting at a local login prompt when I started, and is sitting there again
> as I doubt my ssh login starts the x server.
>
> Does that fit with this error exit on emc's part?
>
> gene at shop:~$ cd emc2
> gene at shop:~/emc2$ emc -l
> EMC2 - 2.4.6
> Machine configuration directory is '/home/gene/emc2/configs/genes-mill'
> Machine configuration file is 'genes-mill.ini'
> Starting EMC2...
> X Error of failed request:  BadWindow (invalid Window parameter)
>  Major opcode of failed request:  3 (X_GetWindowAttributes)
>  Resource id in failed request:  0xffffffff
>  Serial number of failed request:  749
>  Current serial number in output stream:  750
> Shutting down and cleaning up EMC2...
> Cleanup done
> EMC terminated with an error.  You can find more information in the log:
>    /home/gene/emc_debug.txt
> and
>    /home/gene/emc_print.txt
> as well as in the output of the shell command 'dmesg' and in the terminal
>
> Or have I royally screwed the moose here?

Royally, I don't think so. Screwed the moose, possibly.

I definitely wouldn't have made these changes with an X session open,
especially not a gene X session.

Also I would've used 500 rather than gene for the chmod.

I don't know what more to say, especially since I have no idea what
"emc -l" is or does.




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