problem connecting to corporate LAN

Mark Greenwood captain_bodge at yahoo.co.uk
Sun May 23 12:27:06 UTC 2010


On Sunday 23 May 2010 12:07:02 Reinhold Rumberger wrote:
> On Sunday 23 May 2010, Mark Greenwood wrote:
> > This is Linux. Any one of a million things could have changed.
> > It's the downside of open source development that things just
> > break from time to time.
> 
> So, this doesn't happen on Win or Macs? Seriously, this happens in 
> all areas of development because the systems are way too complex to 
> be able to test/think of everything that might go wrong.
> 
>   --Reinhold
> 
> 
I'm not criticising, just saying it's an inevitability. I understand the complexities of software testing only too well.

The difference with Windows or Macintosh is they have a lot more money to throw at testing, and a lot more central control over the development process of the code that goes into an OS release, as well as the fact that third party apps are the responsibility of third parties, who also do their own testing. 

Uniquely with Linux, every single application is "released" by the Linux distro. They actually have more testing to do than MS or Apple, with about a millionth of the resources. The collaborative and open nature of Linux development allows person one to go off and change his library code as and when he pleases. Whether person 2 who is using that library in his application actually updates his application in time for Kubuntu's LTS release is up to person 2, not Kubuntu. Updates are frequent, collaboration is wide-ranging and flexible, and the number of potential pitfalls and incompatabilities is simply vast when compared to the uncollaborative closed-source world where app developers work in a vacuum with a pretty much stable (in terms of updates) OS. Hence, sometimes, Linux releases will contain software that doesn't work. Hence, sometimes, Linux updates will break software that was working before. Yes it happens in Windows-land too, but it's much more likely to happen with Linux for all the reasons I've mentioned. I call it the price of free software.

The original question was "what has changed since Karmic to break this application" -  and seeing as he sent the question twice I felt it deserved some kind of an answer, no matter how unilluminating it was. 

Mark




More information about the kubuntu-users mailing list