<div dir="ltr">And here's some feedback from VDG dude Ken<br><br><div><div class="gmail_quote">---------- Forwarded message ----------<br>From: <b class="gmail_sendername">Ken Vermette</b> <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:vermette@gmail.com">vermette@gmail.com</a>></span><br>Date: 8 April 2015 at 17:39<br>Subject: Re: Default wallpaper<br>To: Jonathan Riddell <<a href="mailto:jr@jriddell.org">jr@jriddell.org</a>><br><br><br><div dir="ltr"><div><div>Oh my! It's changed dramatically since I've seen it! It's looking extremely posh now! I'm quite happy to see how the design has really polished out. I guess maybe I'll just throw some feedback at'chya - sorry for the laundry-list, I'm just excited for the design. ;)<br><ul><li>The pages are quite long; after scrolling past the header, perhaps include a sticky scrollspy (like <a href="http://getbootstrap.com/javascript/#scrollspy" target="_blank">http://getbootstrap.com/javascript/#scrollspy</a>) so navigation in the page is easier. </li><li>On the features page, all the images are centred; this makes the pages mentally tedious. If you have the images vary in position (e.g. centre, left, right, left right centre) it creates better visual appeal an decreases cognitive load. Essentially the brain gets tired of "read/scroll/read", but varying the positions of text breaks reading fatigue. If you do this, sections which are centred are usually the really big-ticket items.<br></li><li>On the features page, several of the images could be cropped or slimmed down a bit; another trick might be overlaying the text on top of visually uninteresting (white-space) portions of the screenshots - maybe having a bit of background under the text overlay to ensure legibility. <br></li><li>On the downloads page it's not immediately obvious that it's an accordion structure. What you may want to do is show the preferred download methods at all times in each section, with a "more download options" button which exposes the rest of the options. <br></li><li>In the footer there's a "Download Kubuntu" link; I would break it out of the list and give it extremely prominent placement so users have a call-to-action after they have browsed a page.</li><li>On the download page above the accordion, I would put in mention that Kubuntu is free and open-source; I wouldn't explain it in philosophical terms, but I would make it clear that the software does not cost money and isn't just some trial. Specifically, phrased in a way that someone completely unfamiliar with open-source would understand they aren't about to be hoodwinked.</li><li>Lastly, I would add an 'installation instructions' page, linked to from the downloads page, including CD burning instructions from a Windows PC or Mac.</li><li>On the homepage it says "Kubuntu is an open-source alternative to Windows and Office" - I think that phrasing diminishes Kubuntu, I'd maybe re-word it to something like "Kubuntu is a free, complete, open-source operating system which includes everything you need to work, play, and share. Created by a worldwide team of expert developers Kubuntu can replace or compliment to operating systems such as Windows and Mac OSX; install Kubuntu on your personal computer to enjoy powerful cutting-edge features in a simple and beautiful package, or deploy it across a network to enjoy the benefits of security and open standards."<br></li></ul><p>On a personal level, I think the page that really needs to hit it out of the park is the features tour, and right now it feels a little unfocused. We have a list of things we can do well, but there's no context to it; I'd probably divide the 'Feature Tour' page into 5 entirely separate pages: 'Overview', Enjoy, Work, Connect, and Create. <br></p><ul><li>For the overview it would just be a list of the other sections with 'learn more' links. <br></li><li>For 'Enjoy' I'd present all the media applications and put a big focus on the face that we have AAA games now; it's still a major misconception that we don't have games, and need to start advertising that a bit.  I don't know if you'd want to email the Valve guys for their graces on using screen-shots of their games, but there are some attractive games that would make a great hero shot. <br></li><li>For Work I'd focus on office, file management, and development. While not necessarily 'sexy', a section explaining how KIO could seamlessly connect to Windows and Mac protocols for sharing and collaborating would be valuable to office workers.<br></li><li>For Connect we would show Firefox, Chat, Mail, and Muon. Possibly push a plasmoids screenshot showing how you can feed information to your desktop without needing 17 applications open.<br></li><li>Lastly, I would also have a 'Create' page showing off Krita, KDenlive, Digikam, and even KDevelop; have the background splash behind Krita be some of the gorgeous artwork from that program. Linux game development is becoming popular, so you may want to mention that Krita has game-specific features such as tiling tools, and has been used in game production on several occasions (which it has!)</li></ul><p>If you went this route, I would also stop linking to the raw screenshot images on click; I'd let them sink into the background a bit, and instead provide one or two links per section to articles and reviews praising the applications. For example, there's a <a href="http://www.blendernation.com/2014/02/20/super-city-was-developed-with-blender-gimp-and-krita/" target="_blank">blendernation article</a> showing Krita being used in developing a game - those sorts of links. <br></p><p>Anyway, fantastic work, I hope that helps!</p><p> - Ken<br></p><br></div></div></div></div><br></div></div>